Baby Greek humidity needs

April Lynn

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Hello all. I am a new tort parent. I have been all over this forum and have learned so much! Being new to torts, I find that everyday I'm questioning how I'm doing things. One big question is humidity. I'm having trouble keeping my enclosure humid for the simple fact that it's an open top plastic tote. I tried covering it with foil but that didnt help. I searched and read @HermanniChris Greek care guide and it was everything! So helpful. I've been utilizing the lid to the plastic tote for the last two nights. After lights are out, I put the lid on (with holes in it obviously) and the temps drop to a consistent 70°F with humidity ranging from 70% to 90% throughout the enclosure. 70% where my tort sleeps. So I guess my main question is, at night using this method, I'm worried about low temp/high humidity. I've read that this is bad...but I understand night temps need to drop. It all seems contradictory so I am reaching out. During the day the top is off and lights are on, humidity is around 25% near basking spot & 55% in the hot hide. I'm guessing my tort is the sensitive type greek from what I've read. He (or she) burrows a lot exposing him to the moisture in the substrate which I understand is key. His daytime 20200119_072549.jpg 20200119_072505.jpg 20200108_131606.jpg 20200110_122900.jpg temps seem great and he eats like he just got out of prison so he seems healthy and content and I do soak him daily. So it's just the humidity with nighttime temps that I'm concerned about. I have a CHE that I used prior to reading the greek care guide, I removed it because it kept night temps way too high. By the way, his Name is Yoda. I'll attach some pictures since we all LOVE pics!
 

Yvonne G

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If there's too much humidity and it gets cold/cool, that's not a good thing. You can allow a slight drop in temperature for night time, but because baby bodies are small, they cool off pretty quickly. I like to keep my temperature for babies no cooler than about 78F degrees at night. You can buy a thermostat for your CHE to maintain the correct temperature. Plug the CHE into the thermostat, then plug the thermostat into the wall socket.
 

April Lynn

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Thank you for your response. Should I keep with the lid at night still to trap the humidity? Cut a hole in the top, wrap edges with foil and put the lamp down on it? Humidity levels drop a ton during the day with the lid off but if he's getting all that humidity at night is the drop during the day ok?
 

Yvonne G

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The only testudo I keep is russians, so I'm not real familiar with your species, and I haven't read Chris's care sheet. I would worry though about the baby getting too cold if it's real humid in there.
 

April Lynn

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Thank you Yvonne. I'll wait and see if Chris is able to lend some advice on this. Thanks again for responding!
 

April Lynn

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@SweetGreekTorts I've read through your website, great info! I believe my tort is a Testudo Graeca Terrestris...Mesopotamian? Can you confirm? Also, to touch back on my post about humidity, your site states warm and dry (little humidity)...does that apply to hatchlings as well? If so (or even if not) what is your recommended humidity levels for day and night for a hatchling. As stated above I soak daily (he (or she) drinks sometimes during his soak) so Yoda is well hydrated but I'm just freaking out a bit about humidity. Thank you in advance for any advice you have.
 

Canadian Mojo

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I've been using one of these: Inkbird controller

combined with a heater and one of these: Fogger

to keep things where they should be for a Redfoot.

I'm just keeping conditions constant so you might want a different controller that allows for changing thru the day (I believe this one only allows for adjusting the temp control and it doesn't have a proper clock) but it gives you an idea of what's out there. The fogger works well but I have hard well water so I have to use distilled water to keep from killing the thing. Realistically, any manual on/off humidifier would work with the controller so I didn't really need this particular unit -- it was just convenient and on sale when I needed it.
 

April Lynn

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I've been using one of these: Inkbird controller

combined with a heater and one of these: Fogger

to keep things where they should be for a Redfoot.

I'm just keeping conditions constant so you might want a different controller that allows for changing thru the day (I believe this one only allows for adjusting the temp control and it doesn't have a proper clock) but it gives you an idea of what's out there. The fogger works well but I have hard well water so I have to use distilled water to keep from killing the thing. Realistically, any manual on/off humidifier would work with the controller so I didn't really need this particular unit -- it was just convenient and on sale when I needed it.
Thank you for the info. I'll consider it if more humidity is in fact needed.
 

SweetGreekTorts

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@SweetGreekTorts I've read through your website, great info! I believe my tort is a Testudo Graeca Terrestris...Mesopotamian? Can you confirm? Also, to touch back on my post about humidity, your site states warm and dry (little humidity)...does that apply to hatchlings as well? If so (or even if not) what is your recommended humidity levels for day and night for a hatchling. As stated above I soak daily (he (or she) drinks sometimes during his soak) so Yoda is well hydrated but I'm just freaking out a bit about humidity. Thank you in advance for any advice you have.
Yes, your baby is a Testudo graeca terrestris/Mesopotamian. Beautiful one too!

I read your initial post and your temps and humidity seem fine for daytime and nighttime. I keep my humidity for this particular subspecies around 30-50% with warmer temps during daytime and lower temps (around 70, just the normal ambient temperature in my house) during the night, and the humidity adjusts itself. I provide a humid hide that is warmed by a CHE 24/7. If you are soaking regularly and providing a warm humid hide, then the tortoise has the ability to use it when it wants to. Mine always sleep in their hides at night.
 

April Lynn

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Yes, your baby is a Testudo graeca terrestris/Mesopotamian. Beautiful one too!

I read your initial post and your temps and humidity seem fine for daytime and nighttime. I keep my humidity for this particular subspecies around 30-50% with warmer temps during daytime and lower temps (around 70, just the normal ambient temperature in my house) during the night, and the humidity adjusts itself. I provide a humid hide that is warmed by a CHE 24/7. If you are soaking regularly and providing a warm humid hide, then the tortoise has the ability to use it when it wants to. Mine always sleep in their hides at night.
Thank you so much for your reply! I feel much better now. It's amazing how much we obsess over everything! I will follow your lead with the humidity.
 

HermanniChris

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April, @SweetGreekTorts gave you good advice. Follow that and it looks like you’re doing well. As stated in my care guide, don’t keep it warm at night, and let that humidity build/adjust itself. Lid off during the day and allow it to dry up a bit. The keys are cooler nights and high humidity which you already have an idea of. Sorry I can’t go more in depth right now. Swamped over here.
 

April Lynn

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April, @SweetGreekTorts gave you good advice. Follow that and it looks like you’re doing well. As stated in my care guide, don’t keep it warm at night, and let that humidity build/adjust itself. Lid off during the day and allow it to dry up a bit. The keys are cooler nights and high humidity which you already have an idea of. Sorry I can’t go more in depth right now. Swamped over here.
Thank you for taking time to reply Chris. I really appreciate everybody's insight and I feel much better about my humidity concerns. I LOVE this forum and I'm so thankful for it. Thank you!!
 

jso

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Not wanting to confuse the OP, whose methods have been affirmed by others, but just to say that it’s perfectly possible to raise Mediterranean species hatchlings (I put it like that because mine are Hermanns, not testudo graeca - but their requirements are similar) that are pretty smooth, without worrying too much, frankly, about humidity levels.
My babies (well, they’re juveniles now) have been raised in an open topped tortoise table in a normal domestic room. CH in the winter season for human level of comfort, (on either side of a short hibernation).Not so much in spring and usually none in summer, unless we get a really cold spell although by then they’re usually outside in an open-topped landscaped enclosure with rocks, Mediterranean planting, and bark hides etc. (I’m in the north of the UK). Indoors, sand/soil soil substrate, deep enough for them to scrape into a little. They usually retreat to the corners, where it’s cooler, at bedtime. PAR 38 halogen floodlights for basking and which also increase the ambient temps in the enclosure (but there’s obviously a temp gradient) and UV tube running the length of the table. No overnight heating. I’d certainly agree with HermanniChris and SweetGreekTorts on that. They just don’t need it (unless the room they’re in gets down to 5*C or lower ). Water always available, in containers big enough for them to get into if they need to. But mine never really chose to soak themselves - just got in there to drink.

I’ve said I haven’t worried too much about humidity levels - and actually that’s partly because didn’t have a hygrometer to measure them when they were hatchlings. (Just recently got a remote thermometer/hygrometer when I was given a pair of red foots last year, where I think high humidity levels are more important than for Mediterranean species, although I don’t know how accurate it is)
 

April Lynn

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Not wanting to confuse the OP, whose methods have been affirmed by others, but just to say that it’s perfectly possible to raise Mediterranean species hatchlings (I put it like that because mine are Hermanns, not testudo graeca - but their requirements are similar) that are pretty smooth, without worrying too much, frankly, about humidity levels.
My babies (well, they’re juveniles now) have been raised in an open topped tortoise table in a normal domestic room. CH in the winter season for human level of comfort, (on either side of a short hibernation).Not so much in spring and usually none in summer, unless we get a really cold spell although by then they’re usually outside in an open-topped landscaped enclosure with rocks, Mediterranean planting, and bark hides etc. (I’m in the north of the UK). Indoors, sand/soil soil substrate, deep enough for them to scrape into a little. They usually retreat to the corners, where it’s cooler, at bedtime. PAR 38 halogen floodlights for basking and which also increase the ambient temps in the enclosure (but there’s obviously a temp gradient) and UV tube running the length of the table. No overnight heating. I’d certainly agree with HermanniChris and SweetGreekTorts on that. They just don’t need it (unless the room they’re in gets down to 5*C or lower ). Water always available, in containers big enough for them to get into if they need to. But mine never really chose to soak themselves - just got in there to drink.

I’ve said I haven’t worried too much about humidity levels - and actually that’s partly because didn’t have a hygrometer to measure them when they were hatchlings. (Just recently got a remote thermometer/hygrometer when I was given a pair of red foots last year, where I think high humidity levels are more important than for Mediterranean species, although I don’t know how accurate it is)
I'm managing to keep humidity levels at 30-50% now which seems to be the perfect level for this specific subspecies. When I originally posted this I was very worried because I thought I had to keep it at 60%+ which was so hard for me to accomplish. I finally have a handle on that, plus temps and my daily routine with Yoda. He's been with me now for 2.5 weeks and he's healthy, active and eats well and I feel like I can relax a little and stop obsessing over every little thing lol. Thank you for your input, I'm so grateful for everyone who's out there to help us newbies.
 
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jso

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I'm managing to keep humidity levels at 30-50% now which seems to be the perfect level for this specific subspecies. When I originally posted this I was very worried because I thought I had to keep it at 60%+ which was so hard for me to accomplish. I finally have a handle on that, plus temps and my daily routine with Yoda. He's been with me now for 2.5 weeks and he's healthy, active and eats well and I feel like I can relax a little and stop obsessing over every little thing lol. Thank you for your input, I'm so grateful for everyone who's out there to help us newbies.
Great!
 

Moonfleur54

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Apr 21, 2021
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Millersport, Ohio
Hello all. I am a new tort parent. I have been all over this forum and have learned so much! Being new to torts, I find that everyday I'm questioning how I'm doing things. One big question is humidity. I'm having trouble keeping my enclosure humid for the simple fact that it's an open top plastic tote. I tried covering it with foil but that didnt help. I searched and read @HermanniChris Greek care guide and it was everything! So helpful. I've been utilizing the lid to the plastic tote for the last two nights. After lights are out, I put the lid on (with holes in it obviously) and the temps drop to a consistent 70°F with humidity ranging from 70% to 90% throughout the enclosure. 70% where my tort sleeps. So I guess my main question is, at night using this method, I'm worried about low temp/high humidity. I've read that this is bad...but I understand night temps need to drop. It all seems contradictory so I am reaching out. During the day the top is off and lights are on, humidity is around 25% near basking spot & 55% in the hot hide. I'm guessing my tort is the sensitive type greek from what I've read. He (or she) burrows a lot exposing him to the moisture in the substrate which I understand is key. His daytime View attachment 285129 View attachment 285130 View attachment 285131 View attachment 285132 temps seem great and he eats like he just got out of prison so he seems healthy and content and I do soak him daily. So it's just the humidity with nighttime temps that I'm concerned about. I have a CHE that I used prior to reading the greek care guide, I removed it because it kept night temps way too high. By the way, his Name is Yoda. I'll attach some pictures since we all LOVE pics!
Such a cutie! I have a 6 month old Greek.
 

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