Baby Red Foot doesn't like water...

Jennifer G

New Member
Joined
Aug 18, 2017
Messages
10
Location (City and/or State)
Buffalo, NY
Hi everyone: I have a question for the forum: I've had this baby red foot for about a month and a half. He doesn't seem to like the water. I try to soak him every other day, but he HATES it! He spends the whole time trying to get out of the dishpan. I feel bad leaving him in there. He doesn't really soak himself in his water either. He'll drink, but from the edge mostly. How important is it for him to be soaked? I understand it's to help prevent pyramiding, but is there another way? I spray him once or twice a day and try to keep humidity up. Any suggestions are welcomed. Thanks!
 

Millerlite

Well-Known Member
10 Year Member!
Joined
Nov 20, 2008
Messages
2,673
Location (City and/or State)
Southern Calif.
Hello, are the soaks in luke warm water? Sometimes it just takes time for younger tortoises to like water. Sometimes they just don't like it as much as others. My redfoot tortoises will walk through water dishes but they don't soak as much as my MT. tortoises. They do drink by taking sips on the way by. I would keep soaking in warm water just to keep your youngster hydrated. I would not worry that he/she doesn't love water. I found reds to like being sprayed or sprinklers can always try that too.
 

wellington

Well-Known Member
Moderator
10 Year Member!
Tortoise Club
Joined
Sep 6, 2011
Messages
43,740
Location (City and/or State)
Chicago, Illinois, USA
It is important to keep them hydrated for health reason besides just pyramiding. Make sure water is warm, stays warm and make it just deep enough that it comes just above where the top and bottom shell meet. It's for the good of the tort and he doesn't know any better. That's where we need to do the right thing. Instead of feeling bad for him, think of him getting good exercise and well hydrated which both are good for his health.
 

Jennifer G

New Member
Joined
Aug 18, 2017
Messages
10
Location (City and/or State)
Buffalo, NY
Thank you. I'll keep soaking him in lukewarm water and hope he doesn't grow up hating me. LOL
 

Millerlite

Well-Known Member
10 Year Member!
Joined
Nov 20, 2008
Messages
2,673
Location (City and/or State)
Southern Calif.
yeah that sounds about right. Just keep an eye on the water temp. Don't let it get to cold during the time, if it does just replace it with more warm water.

Kyle
 

ZEROPILOT

REDFOOT WRANGLER
Moderator
Tortoise Club
5 Year Member
Platinum Tortoise Club
Joined
Jul 16, 2014
Messages
26,503
Location (City and/or State)
South Eastern Florida (U.S.A.)/Rock Hill S.C.
And how long should I leave him in the water? I've seen anywhere between 10 to 20 minutes.
I remove them when the water cools down. About 20 minutes.
Also, I use a high sided large bowl where escape is not an option.
 

theguy67

Well-Known Member
10 Year Member!
Joined
Sep 13, 2009
Messages
587
You've received good advice. My guess is he may not have had access to a proper dish to self soak, before you got him. All of the red-foots I've hatched, I provided with a dish in their cage and have not had one that refuses to soak.
 

TammyJ

Well-Known Member
5 Year Member
Joined
Jun 21, 2016
Messages
4,308
Location (City and/or State)
Jamaica
Apart from having the water temperature warm and leaving him for about 15 minutes, I think it is important to cover the container almost completely. I soak mine every morning in a sterlite tub with a tile covering it, leaving just a slice of opening on either side at the top. This helps to maintain the temperature and increase the beneficial humidity of the soak, giving him a kind of "steam bath" or spa effect. Just be sure the water is not too hot (it should feel barely warm on your hand), that the sides of the tub are semi-opaque (not completely see-through) and that you monitor him in it so that there are no accidents like flipping over on his back.
 

Madkins007

Well-Known Member
Moderator
10 Year Member!
Joined
Feb 15, 2008
Messages
5,393
Location (City and/or State)
Nebraska
Lots of people use forced soaks successfully, and lots of people avoid them. I started using them, then gave them up. (Disclaimer- I don't have torts anymore.) Instead, I focused on a nice warm, humid habitat. I also worked hard to make sure the water pool was accessible to the young'uns- recessed the dish for easy entry, used sloped sides with non-skid textures for easy in and out, moderated the depth so it was only about half as deep as they were tall. They didn't use it a lot, but they did use it.

My reason for doing this was partly due to my understanding of waterproof reptile skin. As best I can tell, while reptile skin does plump a little in water, they do not really absorb moisture, and they do not retain that moisture long, so I really don't think that soaking has as big an effect as maintaining the right climate does.
 

New Posts

Top