Bolted lettuce?

C_P808

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My neighbor has a hydroponic garden, and they have bolted romaine lettuce. They don't want it because according to Google, the leaves are a bit bitter compared to regular romaine. So they asked if we want it for our Sulcata. Anyone know if it's okay for them eat it?
 

method89

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It is just flowering lettuce. I cant imagine why it wouldn't be fine.
 

Tom

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I had to look up what "bolted" meant. I just call it "going to seed".

Yes. Its fine to feed it to the tortoises. A friend of mine just gave me three giant heads of "bolted romaine" and cabbage. My tortoises devoured it like candy. I wouldn't use romaine as a regular food item, but no problem to feed them some once in a while.
 

Bren_Lowe

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My neighbor has a hydroponic garden, and they have bolted romaine lettuce. They don't want it because according to Google, the leaves are a bit bitter compared to regular romaine. So they asked if we want it for our Sulcata. Anyone know if it's okay for them eat it?
Normal romaine is perfectly fine in moderation, so I imagine any variant kind is fine as well.
 

janibabayoga

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It is possible to prevent bitter lettuce by taking some simple steps. First, start with high-quality seeds or transplants from a reputable source. Make sure to plant them in well-draining soil that is rich in organic matter. Once the plants are established, water them deeply and evenly, keeping the leaves dry to prevent fungal diseases.
 

janibabayoga

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Lettuce plants can experience stress from a variety of environmental conditions that cause the leaves to become bitter. For example, lettuce that is planted in soil that is too dry or has poor drainage may be more likely to turn bitter. Additionally, lettuce that is exposed to high temperatures (over 85 degrees Fahrenheit) for extended periods of time may also become bitter. https://gardenprofy.com/why-is-my-garden-lettuce-bitter/
 

Loohan

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Lettuce plants can experience stress from a variety of environmental conditions that cause the leaves to become bitter. For example, lettuce that is planted in soil that is too dry or has poor drainage may be more likely to turn bitter. Additionally, lettuce that is exposed to high temperatures (over 85 degrees Fahrenheit) for extended periods of time may also become bitter. https://gardenprofy.com/why-is-my-garden-lettuce-bitter/

Yes. Here in Zone 6B i can usually eat lettuce until early summer but seldom much beyond that, even under pretty ideal soil and water conditions. Not only do they want to go to flower, but the central stalk shoots up and turns bitter, and the new leaves become very small, thicker, and to some extent bitter. Eventually even with pruning the stem, the leaves are too few and too tiny and/or bitter to mess with.
By that time i'm usually into basil salads, and basil needs much afternoon shade to do well in the summer.
 
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