Do Redfoots really prefer groups?

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Mgridgaway

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I read on a new article at Tortoise Library the other day that Redfoots actually seem to prefer company. I was always under the impression that most tortoises, as well as most reptiles, are solitary creatures. Can anyone share their experiences? I don't want Darwin to get lonely!
 

Yvonne G

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I don't keep redfoots so I don't have first hand experience, but in my opinion, they tolerate rather than prefer other tortoise's company.
 

bigred

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emysemys said:
I don't keep redfoots so I don't have first hand experience, but in my opinion, they tolerate rather than prefer other tortoise's company.

I have 2 males and 2 females and they do seem to hang together under the same bush. I have a huge yard so they can get away from
each other if they want to. They also sleep face to face I attached a picture of this. This is a male and female. My males do get a little crazy with each other when mating
 

Tortoise

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I Think if they are together they hang around together but I don't necessarily think they would be lonely if they lived alone.

Mine always choose to sleep together most nights and they have many places they could choose to be apart
 

Madkins007

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Remember, these are not human-like mammals. Terms like 'lonely' probably do not apply.

In the wild, Red-foots are often found in groups- they cluster up in hides, share in fruit falls and carrion finds, etc. More interestingly, they leave scent trails for others to follow- that is not the act of a purely solitary animal. Some research on some other tortoises suggest they also can communicate with subsonic noises that transmit through the ground as vibrations- another act that a purely solitary species generally would not bother with.

However, when they do cluster, they show little sign of social organization other than the detail that the biggest usually 'wins'.

There are a lot of benefits to you to keep a small group, generally 3-5 animals. Other than the space needs (and related issues of heat, etc.), everything else is about the same for one or three. In a group, if one eats, it spurs the others to eat. If one explores, another almost always goes too, etc. They are just generally more active and engaged.

However, no one has ever found any sign that they suffer in any real sense by being alone... although if they HAVE a long-time companion and loose it, they do seem to show clear signs of missing it.
 

Angrycowgoesmoo

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ehh I don't think they are lonely but I think they would be okay with company and okay without it. I don't really want to get one for mine because I'm worried I might get babies.
 

austinl01

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Madkins007 said:
Remember, these are not human-like mammals. Terms like 'lonely' probably do not apply.

In the wild, Red-foots are often found in groups- they cluster up in hides, share in fruit falls and carrion finds, etc. More interestingly, they leave scent trails for others to follow- that is not the act of a purely solitary animal. Some research on some other tortoises suggest they also can communicate with subsonic noises that transmit through the ground as vibrations- another act that a purely solitary species generally would not bother with.

However, when they do cluster, they show little sign of social organization other than the detail that the biggest usually 'wins'.

There are a lot of benefits to you to keep a small group, generally 3-5 animals. Other than the space needs (and related issues of heat, etc.), everything else is about the same for one or three. In a group, if one eats, it spurs the others to eat. If one explores, another almost always goes too, etc. They are just generally more active and engaged.

However, no one has ever found any sign that they suffer in any real sense by being alone... although if they HAVE a long-time companion and loose it, they do seem to show clear signs of missing it.

Thanks. Great info!
 

heyprettyrave

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My two always liked to be each other i though :) wherever one of them was the other was there too
 

N2TORTS

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Madkins007 said:
Remember, these are not human-like mammals. Terms like 'lonely' probably do not apply.

In the wild, Red-foots are often found in groups- they cluster up in hides, share in fruit falls and carrion finds, etc. More interestingly, they leave scent trails for others to follow- that is not the act of a purely solitary animal. Some research on some other tortoises suggest they also can communicate with subsonic noises that transmit through the ground as vibrations- another act that a purely solitary species generally would not bother with.

However, when they do cluster, they show little sign of social organization other than the detail that the biggest usually 'wins'.

There are a lot of benefits to you to keep a small group, generally 3-5 animals. Other than the space needs (and related issues of heat, etc.), everything else is about the same for one or three. In a group, if one eats, it spurs the others to eat. If one explores, another almost always goes too, etc. They are just generally more active and engaged.

However, no one has ever found any sign that they suffer in any real sense by being alone... although if they HAVE a long-time companion and loose it, they do seem to show clear signs of missing it.

Spot On ! ...... I can assure at my house, and the 7 years I've been adding to the " herd" ... All of my torts are accustomed to each other, and the 4 males I do have within the herd , dont show all that much aggression other than the norm , which stimulates reproduction. I have 17 in the RF and Cherry Herd ..
I might add with that many animals or any kind of multi torts , the one and most important is to maintain perfect health , and isolate a sick tort immediately , or you will infect other animals within the group rather quickly.


JD~ :)
 

terryo

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OK..bad me, but...........When I first got my Cherry Head I also got a Three Toed hatchling. They were both the same age, needed the same requirements....housing, temperature, humidity etc., both CB, so I decided to put them together. They lived together for over 2 years. The Cherry Head followed the little Three Toed around and slept in the same hide, even though there were two hides. I got so much bashing for doing this, that I took the Three Toed out of the vivarium. My CH didn't eat for days and just paced around the viv ....back and forth, back and forth. Finally she stopped eating all together, and went in her hide and stayed there. I thought she was going to become sick, so I put the Three Toed back in with her. The next day she was eating again, and was back to normal. I loved watching them interact together. They were very comical. A bad thing happened and I lost the Three Toed, but no one can tell me that my CH didn't "miss" her companion.
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GeoTerraTestudo

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Wow, this is amazing. I always thought that red foots were simply better at tolerating others of their own kind, but it sounds like they really are gregarious. I think Manouria are more social, but nevertheless, it sounds like red foots are better off in groups!
 

llamas55

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terryo said:
OK..bad me, but...........When I first got my Cherry Head I also got a Three Toed hatchling. They were both the same age, needed the same requirements....housing, temperature, humidity etc., both CB, so I decided to put them together. They lived together for over 2 years. The Cherry Head followed the little Three Toed around and slept in the same hide, even though there were two hides. I got so much bashing for doing this, that I took the Three Toed out of the vivarium. My CH didn't eat for days and just paced around the viv ....back and forth, back and forth. Finally she stopped eating all together, and went in her hide and stayed there. I thought she was going to become sick, so I put the Three Toed back in with her. The next day she was eating again, and was back to normal. I loved watching them interact together. They were very comical. A bad thing happened and I lost the Three Toed, but no one can tell me that my CH didn't "miss" her companion.
006-3.jpg

022.jpg
so does your CH have a new companion he also follows around? I think they prefer company, and it's just not about liking the same warm (or whatever) spot.
 
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