ELEMENT OF HIBISCUS NUTRITION

Status
Not open for further replies.

N2TORTS

Well-Known Member
5 Year Member
Joined
Feb 21, 2010
Messages
8,803
So what is specifically an element of hibiscus nutrition?
There are three types of hibiscus flowers, each of which has distinct growing preferences and or values of nutrition. Lets start by noting, Hibiscus belongs to the mallow or Malvaceae family.

Tropical Hibiscus (Hibiscus rosa-sinensis)
The state flower of Hawaii, tropical Hibiscus is a perennial in its native environment, but because of its bright and vibrant colors, Tropical hibiscus thrives in full sun to partial shade.

Rose of Sharon (syriacus L.)
The rose of Sharon is a hardy, easy-to-grow shrub. It blooms from late summer to mid-autumn and, in proper conditions, can thrive without attention or special care.

Hardy Hibiscus (Hibiscus sabdariffa)
The hardy hibiscus grows the largest flowers, with blooms that can get to be 8 inches across. Although each flower lives only for one day, the plant generally produces hundreds in one season. Hardy hibiscus prefers 5 to 6 hours of sunshine a day , and this hibiscus is a late bloomer, with green shoots that don't begin to show until late in the spring or early summer, and the first flowers appearing late in the summer. They continue to flower until the frost kills the last of the buds ( which is not a problem in So Cal. ).

Now for the actual value and benefits of the plant .Hibiscus is considered to be a good source of vitamin C, calcium, iron, niacin and riboflavin, and is known to be a good source of antioxidants. However, there are several varieties the traditional camelia sinensus variety and of the herbal and fruit teas, are considered to be good sources of antioxidants. It’s known that hibiscus is a diuretic.
Hibiscus flowers possess different properties, uses, and characteristics. Annual Hibiscus is altogether a different plant, which is capable of healing many ailments. A nonwoody, soft plant is an annual shrub and as mentioned before in the Malvaceae family. This plant bears bright yellow colored flowers, having a nice fragrance.
Annual hibiscus’s seeds possesses similar fragrance of musk; sweet. It contains useful chemical nutrients that are beneficial for our health. From the ancient days, it is considered as anti- spasmodic, thus beneficial in healing intestinal disorder and stomach spasms.
The leaves of this shrub are also used to cure snakebites.
It boost the appetite, thus helps you in making good health.
The intake of annual hibiscus is considered very much beneficial on respiratory troubles and headaches.
Annual hibiscus kills the bacteria present in our digestive tract, thus improving digestion system.
The traditional herb is very well known to boost the blood circulation of the body.
As it possesses pleasant fragrance, annual hibiscus is widely used in the production of perfumes, cosmetic creams, soaps, and detergents.
This Indian traditional herb is extensively used by Arabs to savoring the coffee.
The seeds of the herb has the property of antiseptic, thus the application of these seeds heals the wound and kills all bacteria.
It also cools down the burning sensation during injuries.
Annual hibiscus is popular for its aphrodisiac properties. ( oh yea baby!) ……
Apart from the medicinal uses, it is also used in various cuisines. In gulf countries, annual hibiscus is added to flavor coffee.
Just an insight on types of hibiscus and their properties that seem beneficial not only to tortoises but humans alike. They are easy to grow , fast growing at that …. And produce beautiful blooms ….

JD~:)
 

Yvonne G

Old Timer
TFO Admin
10 Year Member!
Platinum Tortoise Club
Joined
Jan 23, 2008
Messages
91,627
Location (City and/or State)
Clovis, CA
Thanks for that, JD. Its nice to know what we're growing to feed our babies.
 

Angi

Active Member
5 Year Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2010
Messages
2,745
Location (City and/or State)
La Mesa, CA.
That is very interesting. Have you tried eating them? I am thinking about adding a flower to my daily smothie.
 

Madkins007

Well-Known Member
Moderator
10 Year Member!
Joined
Feb 15, 2008
Messages
5,393
Location (City and/or State)
Nebraska
The actual petals have nice trace elements, a light flavor, and a touch of sweetness, but the main benefits tend to come from the calyx.
 

Angi

Active Member
5 Year Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2010
Messages
2,745
Location (City and/or State)
La Mesa, CA.
My torts eat a lot, as I have a ton. But now I am thinking I should be eatting them too. Does anyone else feel like they should add Hibiscus to their diet. JD did a great job of explaining the nutritional value.
@ JD do all colors have the same nutritional value? I always wonder this because some colors are easy to grow and very productive and some like my white and yellow are small and don't flower as much.
 

N2TORTS

Well-Known Member
5 Year Member
Joined
Feb 21, 2010
Messages
8,803
Angi said:
That is very interesting. Have you tried eating them? I am thinking about adding a flower to my daily smothie.

Angi ....yes I have used them in cooking dishes , as well as dressing up the table fare.
I also use a sort of " Hibiscus tea" for the torts once a month, just fill the waterdish up and wa la ~
And for those hard working tort keepers, a nice refreshing drink......you should try .
JAMAICAN SORREL(aka. Hibiscus Sabdariffa)
RECIPE:
1/8 tea spoon ground allspice (pimento) or about 12 whole allspice (optional)
6 oz dried sorrel
2 rounded table spoon dry ginger
8 cups water
2.5 cups water for re-draft
1.5 cups white sugar

Yields 8.5 cups of drink

1. Spread the sorrel out on aluminum foil or a white cloth which will make it easy to spot and remove any debris or unfit sorrel pieces.

2. After you have cleaned the sorrel pour it into a large cooking pot with 8 cups of water. Add the the two rounded tablespoons of ginger.

3. Boil the mixture for10 minutes after it begins to boil. Remove immediately and pour through a strainer into a suitable container.

4. Return the remains from the straner and return to the cooking pot and add 2.5 cups of water. Bring to a rapid boil again and remove after 10 minutes.

5. Strain the mixture and discard the residue.

6. Sweeten with 1.5 cups of white sugar or to taste.

7. Cool then serve over ice. Refrigerate the remainder. I like mine " ice cold" ............


**Research confirms that Jamaican Sorrel is high in Vitamins and Minerals with powerful antioxidant properties. It helps lower elevated blood pressure, bad cholesterol and detoxify the entire body. Oxygen Radical Absorption Capacity (ORAC) is a measure of total hydrophilic capacity. In fact, eating high ORAC foods such as Jamaican Sorrel can significantly raise the antioxidant power of human blood. It has a ORAC rating which is higher than vegetable juice, tomato juice and orange juice;

The antioxidant properties in sorrel helps provide our bodies with protection against free radicals, molecules which cause heart disease, stroke, hypertension, Alzheimer's, premature aging and cancer. Sorrel also helps flush the prostate and maintains the proper functioning of the liver, kidney and bladder.

A great natural food/medicine for our shelled buddies as well as ourselves..............;)



JD~:)

emysemys said:
Thanks for that, JD. Its nice to know what we're growing to feed our babies.

U betcha Miss Yvonne' .........;)
 

Angi

Active Member
5 Year Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2010
Messages
2,745
Location (City and/or State)
La Mesa, CA.
I added a few petals and the stem to my smothie and it didn't change the flavor.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top