Harmonious Redfoot groups

ZEROPILOT

REDFOOT WRANGLER
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I only keep Female Redfoot in my collection. I'm against breeding more of them since I get unwanted Redfoot pretty regularly. South Florida is saturated with them.
I sometimes answer post about how multiple Redfoot groups can work. But I don't like just saying that. Because it's not always the case. And it's not that simple.
Usually a group of 1 Male per at least 3 Females can live harmoniously in a very large area. And with only Females, usually 3 or more can also live happily together in a very large enclosure.

For a couple of years, my group of 6 female, or immature males have lived together peacefully. But as of a few months ago, one if my sub adults has started to become aggressive towards my established adult Alpha female and for that reason I'm forced to rehome her (or possibly him)
This happens often.
You must still be prepared to remove one or more torts as time goes by. Because even our best efforts do not duplicate nature.
In nature every one of these Redfoot would live far away from each other. Except to mate. And keeping multiple tortoises together, even peaceful Redfoot is not a science. It's not normal for them and it's not in their best health sometimes.
Its trial and error because not every tortoise will agree to play well with others. Some start to show agression immediately. Others may change when they mature. Others never "seem" to be affected.
They are solitary creatures that sometimes CAN be forced to live together for our convenience.
Every experience may be different.
 
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TammyJ

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I only keep Female Redfoot in my collection. I'm against breeding more of them since I get unwanted Redfoot pretty regularly. South Florida is saturated with them.
I sometimes answer post about how multiple Redfoot groups can work. But I don't like just saying that. Because it's not always the case. And it's not that simple.
Usually a group of 1 Male per at least 3 Females can live harmoniously in a very large area. And with only Females, usually 3 or more can also live happily together in a very large enclosure.

For a couple of years, my group of 6 female, or immature males have lived together peacefully. But as of a few months ago, one if my sub adults has started to become aggressive towards my established adult Alpha female and for that reason I'm forced to rehome her (or possibly him)
This happens often.
You must still be prepared to remove one or more torts as time goes by. Because even our best efforts do not duplicate nature.
In nature every one of these Redfoot would live far away from each other. Except to mate. And keeping multiple tortoises together, even peaceful Redfoot is not a science. It's not normal for them and it's not in their best health sometimes.
Its trial and error because not every tortoise will agree to play well with others. Some start to show agression immediately. Others may change when they mature. Others never "seem" to be affected.
They are solitary creatures that sometimes CAN be forced to live together for our convenience.
Every experience may be different.
Your post is a very helpful one for folks who may be getting tired of so many differing opinions on this subject. As you said, it's not that simple and no one rule always applies in every case. Each situation must be taken in its own context and be decided upon depending on what appears to be happening "on the ground". I suppose though, that if you have to generalize, the safe rule, especially for beginner keepers, is: keep them all separated.
 

ZEROPILOT

REDFOOT WRANGLER
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Your post is a very helpful one for folks who may be getting tired of so many differing opinions on this subject. As you said, it's not that simple and no one rule always applies in every case. Each situation must be taken in its own context and be decided upon depending on what appears to be happening "on the ground". I suppose though, that if you have to generalize, the safe rule, especially for beginner keepers, is: keep them all separated.
Yes.
That'd be more helpful than just saying that groups work.
Groups often work.
A solitary tortoise ALWAYS works
 

Jan A

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Your post is a very helpful one for folks who may be getting tired of so many differing opinions on this subject. As you said, it's not that simple and no one rule always applies in every case. Each situation must be taken in its own context and be decided upon depending on what appears to be happening "on the ground". I suppose though, that if you have to generalize, the safe rule, especially for beginner keepers, is: keep them all separated.
Totally agree with you two. What we humans have been led to believe is that torts desire "companionship" & "isn't that cute" when they appear to be cuddling. Makes me think about every bad date I had when the evening wasn't over fast enough.
 

ZEROPILOT

REDFOOT WRANGLER
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Totally agree with you two. What we humans have been led to believe is that torts desire "companionship" & "isn't that cute" when they appear to be cuddling. Makes me think about every bad date I had when the evening wasn't over fast enough.
Good analogy
 
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