Hibiscus

angelak

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Feb 14, 2014
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17
I have a Hermann's Tortoise. I bought two Hibiscus plants (pink and red) the other day. I was planning on giving flowers and leaves to the tortoise, but on the tag of the plant it says "not for human or animal consumption". I thought Hibiscus was okay? Anyway, the variety is either (each plant had three different tags on it!) Sorbet, Cayman Wind, Luau, or Tonga Wind. Thanks!
 

Tom

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The problem is systemic pesticides. Actually, I am surprised, as I have never seen toxic nursery plants labeled as toxic before.

The commercial nurseries that supply all the stores and nurseries where we buy our potted plants use pesticide granules in the soil. These pesticides are absorbed into the plants tissues and can last for up to one year, according to one of our experienced members here who also works at one of these commercial nurseries. It keeps the plants bug free and looking nice for market.

So if you buy plants from a nursery or the hardware store, you will need to wait at least one year, and then only feed out the new growth that occurs AFTER a year has passed.

This is a big reason why I just grow my own from seeds or cuttings.
 

angelak

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Joined
Feb 14, 2014
Messages
17
Tom said:
The problem is systemic pesticides. Actually, I am surprised, as I have never seen toxic nursery plants labeled as toxic before.

The commercial nurseries that supply all the stores and nurseries where we buy our potted plants use pesticide granules in the soil. These pesticides are absorbed into the plants tissues and can last for up to one year, according to one of our experienced members here who also works at one of these commercial nurseries. It keeps the plants bug free and looking nice for market.

So if you buy plants from a nursery or the hardware store, you will need to wait at least one year, and then only feed out the new growth that occurs AFTER a year has passed.

This is a big reason why I just grow my own from seeds or cuttings.

Thanks, I had no idea!
 

TigsMom

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I plant new Hibiscus in a large flower pot with organic soil, gently knocking off as much of the nursery soil as I can without damaging the root system too much. Then care for the new plant with lots of tlc and allow it to grow strong and get bigger before I use it to feed the torts and/or transplant it into enclosures (not quite a year, but close). I have two really huge 20 year old hibiscus that feed my torts well, slowly but surely I keep planting more. I love the look of hibiscus and they grow well for me here. I think planting the new plants in pots allows better flushing of any chemicals that may be in the nursery soils. I give those potted hibiscus drowning soaks about once a month and let large amounts of water flush out of the pots. Just be mindful of where that water is flushing out to, not near any other plants the torts eat or their enclosures. If you have a sunny window, they do well indoors too. I bring my potted hibiscus in for the winter to avoid frost damage. I was shocked to see one of my new ones blooming indoors! I have a very sunny bay window and it just may get filled up with new Hibiscus, it really was a lovely looking house plant. Hubby asked me to plant more in the new Enclosure to give us a bit more privacy from the neighbors. LOL, I'll get right on that! It'll be a long while before they are tall enough to be a privacy wall, but I'm thrilled to give it a try!
 

angelak

New Member
Joined
Feb 14, 2014
Messages
17
TigsMom said:
I plant new Hibiscus in a large flower pot with organic soil, gently knocking off as much of the nursery soil as I can without damaging the root system too much. Then care for the new plant with lots of tlc and allow it to grow strong and get bigger before I use it to feed the torts and/or transplant it into enclosures (not quite a year, but close). I have two really huge 20 year old hibiscus that feed my torts well, slowly but surely I keep planting more. I love the look of hibiscus and they grow well for me here. I think planting the new plants in pots allows better flushing of any chemicals that may be in the nursery soils. I give those potted hibiscus drowning soaks about once a month and let large amounts of water flush out of the pots. Just be mindful of where that water is flushing out to, not near any other plants the torts eat or their enclosures. If you have a sunny window, they do well indoors too. I bring my potted hibiscus in for the winter to avoid frost damage. I was shocked to see one of my new ones blooming indoors! I have a very sunny bay window and it just may get filled up with new Hibiscus, it really was a lovely looking house plant. Hubby asked me to plant more in the new Enclosure to give us a bit more privacy from the neighbors. LOL, I'll get right on that! It'll be a long while before they are tall enough to be a privacy wall, but I'm thrilled to give it a try!

Thanks for the tips! Will do!
 
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