I would love to get my self a Sulcata Tortoise!!!

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trence666

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Hello everyone! I am new here, this is like the only place I've seen active talk about Turtles haha, I am currently trying to get a Sulcata Tortoise... I'm not very picky on Male or Female, just looking for a good price, reputable breeder :)

I am located in Orangevale, California... Let me know guy's thanks!
 

StudentoftheReptile

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Make sure you do plenty of research beforehand. They look cute as babies, but they can get large sooner than you think.
 

trence666

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StudentoftheReptile said:
Make sure you do plenty of research beforehand. They look cute as babies, but they can get large sooner than you think.

Yes I am currently researching a lot, they are a lot of work...
If anyone wants to give me any opinions on a first turtle that'd be great..
Are Sulcata not good first turtles?

Currently, I want to get a hatchling, I read there a lot a lot of work, need regular soaks 1-2 times a day ect... And honestly I'm looking forward to that not dreading it...
So I think a hatchling is right for me, still not sure if a Sulcata is...
I want to keep him indoor's in a tank for the first year or so, he'll have a tank to be in yes, but mainly he's going to be outside in my yard with me..
I'm going to be making him a home, it's not going to be huge, but not small by anymeans.
 

trence666

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I was thinking about getting a Russian Tortoise perhaps that would be a better suit?
 

Yvonne G

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Hi trence666:

Welcome to the Tortoise forum!!

Whichever one you decide on, make sure you have space outside to build it an outdoor enclosure. Tortoises do much better outside.

May we know your name?
 

Zamric

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Welcome to the Forum!

As the Proud Owner of and adult Sulcata (WalkingRock is 85+lbs) you will need atleast a 1/4 acre back yard per adult Sulcata.

Read this Link Called Sulcata Challange. http://turtlerescues.com/sulcata_challenge.htm If you can do all this, than a Sulcata is for you.... if not, maybe a Leopard Tortoise (same basic care as a Hatchling but you dont end up with a Dinosaure in your back yard)
 

bigred

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They really are not alot of work, just a bit of daily care. Plenty of people on here to buy a Sulcata from
 

Dizisdalife

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Welcome to the Forum. I am glad to see that you are doing the research before getting your pet. They do grow and change quickly during their first couple of years. If you can stay ahead of their growth and establish a routine then they are not any more work that some other pets.
 

mctlong

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trence666 said:
I was thinking about getting a Russian Tortoise perhaps that would be a better suit?

Welcome to the forum! Both Russians and sulcatas have wonderful personalities and both thrive in California due to the sunshine and warm temps. I've got one of each. In my opinion (and I'm sure there are others who disagree), I prefer the outgoing, fearless personalities of Russians, but every individual animal is going to be a little different.

When I was searching for a second tortoise a couple months ago, I put together the following table to compare the two species. Maybe this can help you with your choice. Let us know what you choose. :)

:tort: Sulcatas :tort:

Diet
A varied diet that includes primarily grasses (such as lawn clippings, fescue, timothy hay, orchard grass, etc).

Temps
Cool end with the temps in the high 70s to early 80's and a basking spot at around 105°F

Winter
Do Not Hibernate

Size
Large - Generally between 2 and 3 feet as adults.

Enclosure
Large - Minimum of 40 square feet (such as a 4' x 10' enclosure) per adult. Bigger is better.

Other Considerations
- Adults are too big and destructive to bring inside your home during the winter. Since they do not hibernate, they will need a large, warm, indoor place to hang out during the winter, so you will need to provide a heated barn, an extra large heated dog house, heated shed, or some other large, heated space.
- Adults are heavy. Could be difficult to relocate them during an emergency and transporting to and from the vet can be challenging.


:tort: Russians :tort:

Diet
A varied diet that includes primarily broad leaf plants (such as dandelions, clovers, chia, chicory, turnip greens, etc).

Temps
Cool end with the temps in the low 70's and a basking spot at 90-95°F

Winter
Hibernate

Size
Small - Males are generally between 6 and 8 inches and females are generally between 6 and 10 inches.

Enclosure
Small - Minimum of 6 square feet (such as a 2'x3' pen) for a single, small adult. However, a 10 square feet (such as a 2' x 5' pen) or higher is strongly recommended.

Other Considerations
- If you choose not to hibernate them, they are small enough to be placed in an indoor tort table for the winter.
- Adults are small enough to carry out during an emergency (such as a fire or flood) and can be easily transported to a vet.
- Males tend to be aggressive and territorial around other torts.
 

TortoiseBoy1999

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mctlong said:
Welcome to the forum! Both Russians and sulcatas have wonderful personalities and both thrive in California due to the sunshine and warm temps. I've got one of each. In my opinion (and I'm sure there are others who disagree), I prefer the outgoing, fearless personalities of Russians, but every individual animal is going to be a little different.

When I was searching for a second tortoise a couple months ago, I put together the following table to compare the two species. Maybe this can help you with your choice. Let us know what you choose. :)

:tort: Sulcatas :tort:

Diet
A varied diet that includes primarily grasses (such as lawn clippings, fescue, timothy hay, orchard grass, etc).

Temps
Cool end with the temps in the high 70s to early 80's and a basking spot at around 105°F

Winter
Do Not Hibernate

Size
Large - Generally between 2 and 3 feet as adults.

Enclosure
Large - Minimum of 40 square feet (such as a 4' x 10' enclosure) per adult. Bigger is better.

Other Considerations
- Adults are too big and destructive to bring inside your home during the winter. Since they do not hibernate, they will need a large, warm, indoor place to hang out during the winter, so you will need to provide a heated barn, an extra large heated dog house, heated shed, or some other large, heated space.
- Adults are heavy. Could be difficult to relocate them during an emergency and transporting to and from the vet can be challenging.

:tort: Russians :tort:

Diet
A varied diet that includes primarily broad leaf plants (such as dandelions, clovers, chia, chicory, turnip greens, etc).

Temps
Cool end with the temps in the low 70's and a basking spot at 90-95°F

Winter
Hibernate

Size
Small - Males are generally between 6 and 8 inches and females are generally between 6 and 10 inches.

Enclosure
Small - Minimum of 6 square feet (such as a 2'x3' pen) for a single, small adult. However, a 10 square feet (such as a 2' x 5' pen) or higher is strongly recommended.

Other Considerations
- If you choose not to hibernate them, they are small enough to be placed in an indoor tort table for the winter.
- Adults are small enough to carry out during an emergency (such as a fire or flood) and can be easily transported to a vet.
- Males tend to be aggressive and territorial around other torts.

Thats funny my male Russian is not out going AT ALL he only trusts me and won't let anyone else hold him and even still he's very shy! But I've only had him since April so who knows?! Maybe he'll be outgoing in the future!
 

trence666

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TortoiseBoy1999 said:
mctlong said:
Welcome to the forum! Both Russians and sulcatas have wonderful personalities and both thrive in California due to the sunshine and warm temps. I've got one of each. In my opinion (and I'm sure there are others who disagree), I prefer the outgoing, fearless personalities of Russians, but every individual animal is going to be a little different.

When I was searching for a second tortoise a couple months ago, I put together the following table to compare the two species. Maybe this can help you with your choice. Let us know what you choose. :)

:tort: Sulcatas :tort:

Diet
A varied diet that includes primarily grasses (such as lawn clippings, fescue, timothy hay, orchard grass, etc).

Temps
Cool end with the temps in the high 70s to early 80's and a basking spot at around 105°F

Winter
Do Not Hibernate

Size
Large - Generally between 2 and 3 feet as adults.

Enclosure
Large - Minimum of 40 square feet (such as a 4' x 10' enclosure) per adult. Bigger is better.

Other Considerations
- Adults are too big and destructive to bring inside your home during the winter. Since they do not hibernate, they will need a large, warm, indoor place to hang out during the winter, so you will need to provide a heated barn, an extra large heated dog house, heated shed, or some other large, heated space.
- Adults are heavy. Could be difficult to relocate them during an emergency and transporting to and from the vet can be challenging.

:tort: Russians :tort:

Diet
A varied diet that includes primarily broad leaf plants (such as dandelions, clovers, chia, chicory, turnip greens, etc).

Temps
Cool end with the temps in the low 70's and a basking spot at 90-95°F

Winter
Hibernate

Size
Small - Males are generally between 6 and 8 inches and females are generally between 6 and 10 inches.

Enclosure
Small - Minimum of 6 square feet (such as a 2'x3' pen) for a single, small adult. However, a 10 square feet (such as a 2' x 5' pen) or higher is strongly recommended.

Other Considerations
- If you choose not to hibernate them, they are small enough to be placed in an indoor tort table for the winter.
- Adults are small enough to carry out during an emergency (such as a fire or flood) and can be easily transported to a vet.
- Males tend to be aggressive and territorial around other torts.

Thats funny my male Russian is not out going AT ALL he only trusts me and won't let anyone else hold him and even still he's very shy! But I've only had him since April so who knows?! Maybe he'll be outgoing in the future!

Wow thanks for all the replies, and yes btw my name is Strother.
 
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