Is This A Good Enclosure For My Redfoot?

sowwer

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Can I Improve his enclosure more or is it fine?
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wellington

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Needs to be bigger eventually, unless it's bigger than it looks. What the dimensions? Also needs lots of safe plants added, hanging and planted would be good. Also should have a hide box that you can lock him into at night.
 

sowwer

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Bradenton
Needs to be bigger eventually, unless it's bigger than it looks. What the dimensions? Also needs lots of safe plants added, hanging and planted would be good. Also should have a hide box that you can lock him into at night.
Thank You. Do you know any plants that are safe to plant inside? Maybe like types of grasses? Its 9ft by 10ft, i bring him inside when the sun goes down or it gets cold.
 

ZEROPILOT

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I use ferns, pathos and Spider plants or Lyriopi for shady cover. While they're not ideal as a food source. A well fed RF doesn't spend any time trying to eat them.
I reccomend a big bushy area in the center of that enclosure. Maybe around the tree.
Your Redfoot will walk around the parameters of the enclosure and make a visible trail of worn out grass.
You can use a garden sprinkler on a hose for a semi daily shower for 15 minutes. It'll also help with humidity.
I'd blow out the enclosure twice as big. And make that little house twice as big.
Go as large as you can now. He or she will grow into it. Though what you have now is probably adequate in size. And above average in design. The tree is a great. Natural shade source.
I'd rake up as many of those rocks as possible and get rid of them so that they don't get eaten and throw down a few bags of hardware store mulch. (And check it for plastics or metal shards)
I'd also place some large, flat cement pavers in there. They're great for walking on because they trim nails naturally. Make sure to sink them into the ground so that they lay flat to avoid the shell from scraping as he walks over them.
Cement or slate is also a good surface for feeding. So is terra cotta.
One last (maybe) thing...get a giant plastic plant saucer and use it for a pool for drinking and soaking. Like an 18". Plastic lasts for many years and is easy to clean and keep clean. The 18" saucers are about $10 and the width and height are just about ideal.
Watch your tort carefully. While most Redfoot do not seen to climb at all past a certain age, some do. I'd trust your walls with my own Redfoot group. But there are some that'd be up and over in a flash.
Is your yard fenced? A second level of security is nice to have.
 

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sowwer

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Joined
Oct 17, 2023
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Location (City and/or State)
Bradenton
I use ferns, pathos and Spider plants or Lyriopi for shady cover. While they're not ideal as a food source. A well fed RF doesn't spend any time trying to eat them.
I reccomend a big bushy area in the center of that enclosure. Maybe around the tree.
Your Redfoot will walk around the parameters of the enclosure and make a visible trail of worn out grass.
You can use a garden sprinkler on a hose for a semi daily shower for 15 minutes. It'll also help with humidity.
I'd blow out the enclosure twice as big. And make that little house twice as big.
Go as large as you can now. He or she will grow into it. Though what you have now is probably adequate in size. And above average in design. The tree is a great. Natural shade source.
I'd rake up as many of those rocks as possible and get rid of them so that they don't get eaten and throw down a few bags of hardware store mulch. (And check it for plastics or metal shards)
I'd also place some large, flat cement pavers in there. They're great for walking on because they trim nails naturally. Make sure to sink them into the ground so that they lay flat to avoid the shell from scraping as he walks over them.
Cement or slate is also a good surface for feeding. So is terra cotta.
One last (maybe) thing...get a giant plastic plant saucer and use it for a pool for drinking and soaking. Like an 18". Plastic lasts for many years and is easy to clean and keep clean. The 18" saucers are about $10 and the width and height are just about ideal.
Watch your tort carefully. While most Redfoot do not seen to climb at all past a certain age, some do. I'd trust your walls with my own Redfoot group. But there are some that'd be up and over in a flash.
Is your yard fenced? A second level of security is nice to have.
Wow thank you so much for helping me out, I live in South Florida and the humidity is pretty high most of the time, but I still sometimes spray water in there. For the climbing thing, i don't think it will be a problem, Nelson (my redfoot) hasnt tried to climb the wall, he only goes up on the rocks to bask. I will try to add more plants in the center, i feel like that would make thing 100% better. The plant saucer seems amazing ill definitely get me one. I have this old plastic pool i use to soak him sometimes. And yes my yard is fenced off. Are there any edible plants I can put in there that add variety to his diet? I feed him many different kinds of food, but i like the idea of him having something to munch on when the food is gone.
 

sowwer

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Joined
Oct 17, 2023
Messages
17
Location (City and/or State)
Bradenton
I use ferns, pathos and Spider plants or Lyriopi for shady cover. While they're not ideal as a food source. A well fed RF doesn't spend any time trying to eat them.
I reccomend a big bushy area in the center of that enclosure. Maybe around the tree.
Your Redfoot will walk around the parameters of the enclosure and make a visible trail of worn out grass.
You can use a garden sprinkler on a hose for a semi daily shower for 15 minutes. It'll also help with humidity.
I'd blow out the enclosure twice as big. And make that little house twice as big.
Go as large as you can now. He or she will grow into it. Though what you have now is probably adequate in size. And above average in design. The tree is a great. Natural shade source.
I'd rake up as many of those rocks as possible and get rid of them so that they don't get eaten and throw down a few bags of hardware store mulch. (And check it for plastics or metal shards)
I'd also place some large, flat cement pavers in there. They're great for walking on because they trim nails naturally. Make sure to sink them into the ground so that they lay flat to avoid the shell from scraping as he walks over them.
Cement or slate is also a good surface for feeding. So is terra cotta.
One last (maybe) thing...get a giant plastic plant saucer and use it for a pool for drinking and soaking. Like an 18". Plastic lasts for many years and is easy to clean and keep clean. The 18" saucers are about $10 and the width and height are just about ideal.
Watch your tort carefully. While most Redfoot do not seen to climb at all past a certain age, some do. I'd trust your walls with my own Redfoot group. But there are some that'd be up and over in a flash.
Is your yard fenced? A second level of security is nice to have.
Also super cute tort
 

Alex and the Redfoot

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You can try to get some hibiscus, mulberry or grape vine. They give a lot of shade and leaves are nice addition to diet. With mulberry I would opt for a potted one (or it can easily grow up into a deeply rooted tree).

Succulents, such as opuntia, aeonium and echeveria are fine. If you find any air plants - they are edible too (not very nutritious, just edible).

Also you can add wheat grass, festuca grass, carex. Tradescantia gives a lot of shade and quickly form a "carpet". It's safe for occasional nibbling, like golden pothos.

You can try to plant any edible plants like romaine lettuce or curly endive. But I doubt they have a chance to grow more than a couple of inches before being munched to the root.
 

Tom

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I use ferns, pathos and Spider plants or Lyriopi for shady cover. While they're not ideal as a food source. A well fed RF doesn't spend any time trying to eat them.
I reccomend a big bushy area in the center of that enclosure. Maybe around the tree.
Your Redfoot will walk around the parameters of the enclosure and make a visible trail of worn out grass.
You can use a garden sprinkler on a hose for a semi daily shower for 15 minutes. It'll also help with humidity.
I'd blow out the enclosure twice as big. And make that little house twice as big.
Go as large as you can now. He or she will grow into it. Though what you have now is probably adequate in size. And above average in design. The tree is a great. Natural shade source.
I'd rake up as many of those rocks as possible and get rid of them so that they don't get eaten and throw down a few bags of hardware store mulch. (And check it for plastics or metal shards)
I'd also place some large, flat cement pavers in there. They're great for walking on because they trim nails naturally. Make sure to sink them into the ground so that they lay flat to avoid the shell from scraping as he walks over them.
Cement or slate is also a good surface for feeding. So is terra cotta.
One last (maybe) thing...get a giant plastic plant saucer and use it for a pool for drinking and soaking. Like an 18". Plastic lasts for many years and is easy to clean and keep clean. The 18" saucers are about $10 and the width and height are just about ideal.
Watch your tort carefully. While most Redfoot do not seen to climb at all past a certain age, some do. I'd trust your walls with my own Redfoot group. But there are some that'd be up and over in a flash.
Is your yard fenced? A second level of security is nice to have.
So much good advice here. Love it!
 

sowwer

New Member
Joined
Oct 17, 2023
Messages
17
Location (City and/or State)
Bradenton
You can try to get some hibiscus, mulberry or grape vine. They give a lot of shade and leaves are nice addition to diet. With mulberry I would opt for a potted one (or it can easily grow up into a deeply rooted tree).

Succulents, such as opuntia, aeonium and echeveria are fine. If you find any air plants - they are edible too (not very nutritious, just edible).

Also you can add wheat grass, festuca grass, carex. Tradescantia gives a lot of shade and quickly form a "carpet". It's safe for occasional nibbling, like golden pothos.

You can try to plant any edible plants like romaine lettuce or curly endive. But I doubt they have a chance to grow more than a couple of inches before being munched to the root.
This is rlly nice info ty!
 

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