just checking the identification

platycerium

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hi folks - new to this forum. I have had eastern Hermann's tortoises since 2000, when i started with a CB baby purchased from the San Diego Reptile Expo. I now have a small breeding group of 3 females including a large specimen I have had about 10 years. I recently purchased what was sold as a large male eastern Hermanns tortoise that I plan to use for breeding . His coloration is somewhat different than I have ever seen for T. h. boettgeri and I am wondering if it might be a color variation due to geographical variation from origin or what? Main reason for asking - I just want to make sure i have the species correct ! I include a photo of him side by side photo with my largest female. She is 9 inches long and he is around 6.25 inches long. I have not seen eastern hermann's tortoises with so little black on their carapace as this male tempImageRb8mny.pngexhibits
 

zovick

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hi folks - new to this forum. I have had eastern Hermann's tortoises since 2000, when i started with a CB baby purchased from the San Diego Reptile Expo. I now have a small breeding group of 3 females including a large specimen I have had about 10 years. I recently purchased what was sold as a large male eastern Hermanns tortoise that I plan to use for breeding . His coloration is somewhat different than I have ever seen for T. h. boettgeri and I am wondering if it might be a color variation due to geographical variation from origin or what? Main reason for asking - I just want to make sure i have the species correct ! I include a photo of him side by side photo with my largest female. She is 9 inches long and he is around 6.25 inches long. I have not seen eastern hermann's tortoises with so little black on their carapace as this male View attachment 372719exhibits
@wellington is right about Chris Leone. He will be able to properly ID that tortoise for you.

My own opinion is that it is NOT a Hermann's tortoise, but rather a Greek Tortoise. Most likely a Testudo graeca terrestris, commonly called the Golden Greek Tortoise.

But let's see what Chris has to say.
 

wellington

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@wellington is right about Chris Leone. He will be able to properly ID that tortoise for you.

My own opinion is that it is NOT a Hermann's tortoise, but rather a Greek Tortoise. Most likely a Testudo graeca terrestris, commonly called the Golden Greek Tortoise.

But let's see what Chris has to say.
Maybe that's why the larger tort is looking at in the way he is. Trying to figure out what it is lol
 

HermanniChris

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You have the species correct. It is in fact an Testudo hermanni boettgeri. Beautiful animal and appears to be a classic example of an elderly male from Macedonia. These animals tend to be very yellow, mostly older ones but we have some sub adults that are extreme yellow from this region as well. Attached is a photo of some of ours here but we have others that are pretty much patternless. Interestingly, their babies come out normal or slightly more yellow than average.
 

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platycerium

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You have the species correct. It is in fact an Testudo hermanni boettgeri. Beautiful animal and appears to be a classic example of an elderly male from Macedonia. These animals tend to be very yellow, mostly older ones but we have some sub adults that are extreme yellow from this region as well. Attached is a photo of some of ours here but we have others that are pretty much patternless. Interestingly, their babies come out normal or slightly more yellow than average.
Thanks so much Chris. Do we know the extent of the eastern range of T h boettgeri? If is kazakhstan - then there must be some very cold adapted variants within this subspecies…
 

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