My born and raised outdoors Redfoot thread

VegasJeff

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I dabble in a bit of 3D printing and one thing that comes to mind is print layer resolution. Now just bear with me, but what I am referring to is the distance between each layer in the Z axis (up and down) as the filament gets deposited. In 3D printing the higher the resolution the smaller that distance becomes, which turns out in higher quality and smoother prints. In other words each individual layer uses less plastic than a lower resolution layer, but the overall print takes much longer to complete.

As a pretty much inexperienced keeper speaking out loud what I am saying is that maybe the tortoises are experiencing "low resolution" growth due to the consistency/availability of food. Faster growth, than in the wild, could mean thicker "layers" as they "build" giving the carapace that raised appearance. Could it be that in the wild tortoises experience a sort of waxing and waning availability of foods (thinner layers) and take much longer to grow (longer print time)?

Anyways that is what came to mind.
So what your saying, is that pyramiding might be caused by faster growth? Sounds like a possibility. Would have to get the input of some more experienced members...
 

ZEROPILOT

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I dabble in a bit of 3D printing and one thing that comes to mind is print layer resolution. Now just bear with me, but what I am referring to is the distance between each layer in the Z axis (up and down) as the filament gets deposited. In 3D printing the higher the resolution the smaller that distance becomes, which turns out in higher quality and smoother prints. In other words each individual layer uses less plastic than a lower resolution layer, but the overall print takes much longer to complete.

As a pretty much inexperienced keeper speaking out loud what I am saying is that maybe the tortoises are experiencing "low resolution" growth due to the consistency/availability of food. Faster growth, than in the wild, could mean thicker "layers" as they "build" giving the carapace that raised appearance. Could it be that in the wild tortoises experience a sort of waxing and waning availability of foods (thinner layers) and take much longer to grow (longer print time)?

Anyways that is what came to mind.
That theory could have some merit in it.
In fact, that accelerated growth due to food availability theory is the best I've heard
 

ZEROPILOT

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I believe that humidity and moist cover in warm conditions are the key factors to promote smooth shell growth. Mine are also born and grew outdoors in Jamaica and have very mild pyramiding, hardly noticeable really. I cover their outdoor enclosure with a tarpaulin every night and half uncover it in the daytime but not completely. Damp leaf cover is offered and they will go under it if they feel like it, and they often do. Also, their shells get muddy sometimes, and I believe the mud help keep moisture on their shells. All in all, they get as much warm, damp atmosphere and options as I, the sun, the rain, and nature can provide.
The weather in Jamaica and south Florida is similar.
I like that tarp idea.
I do not do that.
 

ZEROPILOT

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So does mine! Every morning I get her out for her soak and she's covered in the coco underneath her cypress mulch 😆
I know coco is different. But same love of mess lol
Mine can be found swimming/floating in their pools during the day.
When it rains, they go nuts out there.
They all come out and get very excited.
 

TammyJ

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Excited tortoises brings to mind a very funny picture. How, exactly, do tortoises demonstrate excitement and going nuts? 😂 :tort:
If you listen very closely you can hear them screaming "Party Time Everybody!!!"
Really I guess they just walk taller and faster and push out their necks in a confident way that suggests they are excited!
 

TammyJ

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I like this thread. Also I was thinking too that genetics may really have something to do with it, as has been suggested already.
The first few years of their lives are probably lived very much under cover and this is more cover than the older ones are spending most of their time with. The young ones are hiding under the substrate, moist leaves etc. for protection from predators so their shells get that "head start" for smooth growth and the trend is set.
 

ZEROPILOT

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I like this thread. Also I was thinking too that genetics may really have something to do with it, as has been suggested already.
The first few years of their lives are probably lived very much under cover and this is more cover than the older ones are spending most of their time with. The young ones are hiding under the substrate, moist leaves etc. for protection from predators so their shells get that "head start" for smooth growth and the trend is set.
They sure do hide well
 

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