My Latest Endeavor...

NorCal tortoise guy

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 16, 2017
Messages
793
Location (City and/or State)
Northern California
I really can't tell from the picture, but by process of elimination, if it was hawk-like, bigger than a turkey vulture, and dark in color, it would have to be a golden eagle. Nothing else fits the bill.
Maybe next time I can get a better picture I’m thinking golden eagle then. My coworker tells me there is a pair of them that nests near by but I wasn’t sure I believed until I saw this bird. I wish I had had the camera ready when she flew away from the road. Her size was so astonishing to me. We have an over abundance of rabbits around so I guess it might make a nice place to eagles to be.
 

Tom

The Dog Trainer
10 Year Member!
Platinum Tortoise Club
Joined
Jan 9, 2010
Messages
50,355
Location (City and/or State)
Southern California
Maybe next time I can get a better picture I’m thinking golden eagle then. My coworker tells me there is a pair of them that nests near by but I wasn’t sure I believed until I saw this bird. I wish I had had the camera ready when she flew away from the road. Her size was so astonishing to me. We have an over abundance of rabbits around so I guess it might make a nice place to eagles to be.
Keep your eyes out and you might get to see, and hear, a stoop. Eagles soar thousands of feet up. So high that you can't even see them. When they stoop they are every bit as fast as a falcon, but the noise it makes is astonishing. Like they are ripping the sky. If you ever hear it, you'll never forget it.
 

Tom

The Dog Trainer
10 Year Member!
Platinum Tortoise Club
Joined
Jan 9, 2010
Messages
50,355
Location (City and/or State)
Southern California
We are moving from the molt season back into hunting season. During the molt, they are free fed, fat, and happy. At the end of the molting season, we have to drop their weight back down, start exercising them, resume training, and get them ready to hunt. I have several areas near my ranch that are wide open and have safe, suitable perching areas for them up high.

Their first few flights are on creance (fancy falconry name for a long light leash...), and once response seems good, we let them free fly. Once they are free flying, they just need exercise and time in the air to get back in shape. This is also how we get their daily food ration into them. Each day we weigh them, and adjust the amount of food accordingly to slowly drop the weight back down to their "fightin' weight".

For the first day or two, I fly them separately so that I can precisely manage food, and work with each of them one on one with no distractions or interaction issues. This let's me see exactly where their heads are. Once they are free flying and field response is where I want it, we start hunting again. This process is usually about 4 weeks if you count all the weight management time. Well, true to form, my boys are moving ahead of schedule even though their weight is still high. They are literally diving in to their travel boxes, eager to go to work.

On Morty's first day free flying, I had him flying from telephone pole to glove to perch and back again, randomly. There have been an unusually high amount of rabbits running around all summer, presumably due to two years of great rain, and unbeknownst to me, there was a rabbit hiding out in my flying area, where there are usually none. Fat slow Morty decided to show me just how fit, fast, and ready to go hunting he is:
IMG_1382.jpg

This pic also shows the handsome new adult coloration. You can see how they got one of their other common names: Bay wing.
 

Chubbs the tegu

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 9, 2019
Messages
4,331
Location (City and/or State)
Ma
We are moving from the molt season back into hunting season. During the molt, they are free fed, fat, and happy. At the end of the molting season, we have to drop their weight back down, start exercising them, resume training, and get them ready to hunt. I have several areas near my ranch that are wide open and have safe, suitable perching areas for them up high.

Their first few flights are on creance (fancy falconry name for a long light leash...), and once response seems good, we let them free fly. Once they are free flying, they just need exercise and time in the air to get back in shape. This is also how we get their daily food ration into them. Each day we weigh them, and adjust the amount of food accordingly to slowly drop the weight back down to their "fightin' weight".

For the first day or two, I fly them separately so that I can precisely manage food, and work with each of them one on one with no distractions or interaction issues. This let's me see exactly where their heads are. Once they are free flying and field response is where I want it, we start hunting again. This process is usually about 4 weeks if you count all the weight management time. Well, true to form, my boys are moving ahead of schedule even though their weight is still high. They are literally diving in to their travel boxes, eager to go to work.

On Morty's first day free flying, I had him flying from telephone pole to glove to perch and back again, randomly. There have been an unusually high amount of rabbits running around all summer, presumably due to two years of great rain, and unbeknownst to me, there was a rabbit hiding out in my flying area, where there are usually none. Fat slow Morty decided to show me just how fit, fast, and ready to go hunting he is:
View attachment 306153

This pic also shows the handsome new adult coloration. You can see how they got one of their other common names: Bay wing.
Sorry bunny.. thats what happens when u mess with Toms garden
 

Tom

The Dog Trainer
10 Year Member!
Platinum Tortoise Club
Joined
Jan 9, 2010
Messages
50,355
Location (City and/or State)
Southern California
Okay. I'm starting to see a pattern here. Took them out today to fly them together, and instead of participating in my special pre-season falconry training drills, they did this:
IMG_1427 copy.jpg

I don't know how we are supposed to go hunting together if they won't practice their pre-season hunt training drills... :rolleyes:

I need to get some videos to post. These birds are awesome!
 

KarenSoCal

Well-Known Member
Tortoise Club
Platinum Tortoise Club
Joined
Jul 8, 2017
Messages
3,201
Location (City and/or State)
Low desert 50 mi SE of Palm Springs CA
I don't know how we are supposed to go hunting together if they won't practice their pre-season hunt training drills... :rolleyes:
Well, it's pretty obvious to me, though I know nothing of falconry, that they don't need pre-season hunt training drills.

They remember exactly how to hunt. I suspect they are worried about you, since to them it seems you have forgotten and need pre-season hunt training drills to sharpen you up. 😆

Be careful, lest you lose their hard-earned respect! 🙂
 

Tom

The Dog Trainer
10 Year Member!
Platinum Tortoise Club
Joined
Jan 9, 2010
Messages
50,355
Location (City and/or State)
Southern California
Well, it's pretty obvious to me, though I know nothing of falconry, that they don't need pre-season hunt training drills.

They remember exactly how to hunt. I suspect they are worried about you, since to them it seems you have forgotten and need pre-season hunt training drills to sharpen you up. 😆

Be careful, lest you lose their hard-earned respect! 🙂
In all seriousness. I am pleasantly surprised by how quickly they've picked up right where we left off. This whole species is simply amazing, and my boys in particular, amaze me every day. I've read books, magazines and articles about Harris hawks for years, so I suppose I should not be surprised, but its truly awe-inspiring when you see it and experience it first hand. They are still birds, and all the principals of animal training still apply, but due to their highly social nature, they are very forgiving of mistakes, very pliable and amenable to the methods of different falconers, and they just make life fun and easy.
 

Blackdog1714

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2018
Messages
2,408
Location (City and/or State)
Richmond, VA
In all seriousness. I am pleasantly surprised by how quickly they've picked up right where we left off. This whole species is simply amazing, and my boys in particular, amaze me every day. I've read books, magazines and articles about Harris hawks for years, so I suppose I should not be surprised, but its truly awe-inspiring when you see it and experience it first hand. They are still birds, and all the principals of animal training still apply, but due to their highly social nature, they are very forgiving of mistakes, very pliable and amenable to the methods of different falconers, and they just make life fun and easy.
Oh yeah like I am gonna ignore the fact that you practically radiant confince like the sun does light. Your boys read this and have no need for worry just work! Simply awesome sir!
 
Top