New food for Sally

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wellington

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Here are the ingredients.
 

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Diane771

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Well, let's step back and drop this, because as I said before if my vet says it is ok to feed her that I will. I don't know how your tortoise is but Sally can be picky and sometimes won't eat. So I have a wide variety of food for her and mostly fresh vegis I love Sally and all animals even to the extent of not eating meat. So I took your response as criticism as that I am not a good pet owner and you would have to. I read and talked to many people and books about Russian Tortoise before I got her. I am not some teenager thinking it's cool to have a reptile for a pet. Thanks, I think we will have a better understanding and go on
 

Tom

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Well, let's step back and drop this, because as I said before if my vet says it is ok to feed her that I will. I don't know how your tortoise is but Sally can be picky and sometimes won't eat. So I have a wide variety of food for her and mostly fresh vegis I love Sally and all animals even to the extent of not eating meat. So I took your response as criticism as that I am not a good pet owner and you would have to. I read and talked to many people and books about Russian Tortoise before I got her. I am not some teenager thinking it's cool to have a reptile for a pet. Thanks, I think we will have a better understanding and go on
Hi Diane. No one wants to demean or embarrass you. Quite the contrary, we want to help you, and also help anyone reading this thread that doesn't know what to feed tortoises.

I'm sorry but somewhere along the way you've gotten the wrong info about what to feed your tortoise. Tortoises are highly adaptable. Russians in particular are exceptionally hardy and able to survive a lot. The sugars in fruits mess with their intestinal flora and fauna and cause problems. They won't drop dead from eating a bite of apple, but its not "good" for them. Sort of like smoking. Everyone knows it is bad for you, but many people smoke two packs a day and still live for decades.

Likewise, grocery store greens do not meet your tortoises nutritional needs very well. Some of them lack fiber, others have a poor calcium to phosphorous level, low calcium, and some contain deleterious compounds like goiterogens. Best to feed a wide variety broadleaf weeds, leaves, and flowers of the right types. If you must use grocery store greens because you can't get good weeds due to your climate or some other reason, then use grocery store greens, but favor endive and escarole as the main staples. Add in cilantro, arugula, collards, mustard and turnip greens, and a wide variety of others periodically. Squash leaves of any kind are great too. Along with these grocery store greens add in amendments to add fiber, calcium and variety. @Kapidolo Farms offers a wide variety of dried leaves and other stuff you can sprinkle on. @TylerStewart at Tortoisesupply.com offers a fantastic mix of dried flowers to use as a topper. You can also soak ZooMed pellets or Mazuri to add in and make the grocery store greens better. Grocery store greens can work as a last resort, but improve their nutritional value for a tortoise by adding the right variety of amendments to them.

Timothy hay is not a suitable food for Russian tortoises. They are not grass eaters. I have a bunch of tortoises that are grass eating species, and I avoid the Timothy hay because it is too stemmy. You can use soaked horse hay pellets made of Timothy hay to add fiber to grocery store greens for a Russian, and I do this, but this would really be the only capacity where it would be appropriate or useful to feed any kind of "hay" to a Russian tortoise.

You have not learned the hard way how little vets know about tortoise care. For that, I am glad. Same with some breeders, tortoise book authors, and other "reptile experts". The wrong diet and care info has been circulating and being parroted for decades. Here at TFO through a collaborative effort we've been figuring out what is wrong with all that old advice, and also what is right. This is why Barb jumped up to share the correct info with you in such an abrupt manner. I do the same thing sometimes and it just rubs some people the wrong way. I've been insulted and called all sorts of names, but just like Barb, my only intention is to help the tortoises of the world lead better, healthier lives. There is no semester on tortoise care in vet school. Even if your vet is a casual tortoise keeper, there is tremendously high likelihood that your vet has read, learned from, and is now also parroting all the same old wrong info that we here are fighting against. The vast majority of the time vets give bad advice and offer harmful treatments. They just don't know what they don't know, and what they do know is wrong because they got that info from the same old wrong sources that everyone else gets it from. I've been working with many 'reptile" vets since the mid 80s. Its been my job to do so, and I have much more interaction with them than anyone normally would. I've met a few that were amazing and really know their stuff, but most know little to nothing about tortoise care. Even the ones that keep their own tortoises.

Looking at the ingredients, I don't think the Flukers is a good food to offer tortoises. I don't want you to be unhappy with us, or feel picked on, but we can't let incorrect info stand. Too many people read these threads. Wouldn't you do the same if someone on a dog forum was offering bad advice about what to feed their dog? If it was something you knew all about, but the person posting the bad info didn't know better? Wouldn't you speak up? I would.
 

Diane771

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Hi Diane. No one wants to demean or embarrass you. Quite the contrary, we want to help you, and also help anyone reading this thread that doesn't know what to feed tortoises.

I'm sorry but somewhere along the way you've gotten the wrong info about what to feed your tortoise. Tortoises are highly adaptable. Russians in particular are exceptionally hardy and able to survive a lot. The sugars in fruits mess with their intestinal flora and fauna and cause problems. They won't drop dead from eating a bite of apple, but its not "good" for them. Sort of like smoking. Everyone knows it is bad for you, but many people smoke two packs a day and still live for decades.

Likewise, grocery store greens do not meet your tortoises nutritional needs very well. Some of them lack fiber, others have a poor calcium to phosphorous level, low calcium, and some contain deleterious compounds like goiterogens. Best to feed a wide variety broadleaf weeds, leaves, and flowers of the right types. If you must use grocery store greens because you can't get good weeds due to your climate or some other reason, then use grocery store greens, but favor endive and escarole as the main staples. Add in cilantro, arugula, collards, mustard and turnip greens, and a wide variety of others periodically. Squash leaves of any kind are great too. Along with these grocery store greens add in amendments to add fiber, calcium and variety. @Kapidolo Farms offers a wide variety of dried leaves and other stuff you can sprinkle on. @TylerStewart at Tortoisesupply.com offers a fantastic mix of dried flowers to use as a topper. You can also soak ZooMed pellets or Mazuri to add in and make the grocery store greens better. Grocery store greens can work as a last resort, but improve their nutritional value for a tortoise by adding the right variety of amendments to them.

Timothy hay is not a suitable food for Russian tortoises. They are not grass eaters. I have a bunch of tortoises that are grass eating species, and I avoid the Timothy hay because it is too stemmy. You can use soaked horse hay pellets made of Timothy hay to add fiber to grocery store greens for a Russian, and I do this, but this would really be the only capacity where it would be appropriate or useful to feed any kind of "hay" to a Russian tortoise.

You have not learned the hard way how little vets know about tortoise care. For that, I am glad. Same with some breeders, tortoise book authors, and other "reptile experts". The wrong diet and care info has been circulating and being parroted for decades. Here at TFO through a collaborative effort we've been figuring out what is wrong with all that old advice, and also what is right. This is why Barb jumped up to share the correct info with you in such an abrupt manner. I do the same thing sometimes and it just rubs some people the wrong way. I've been insulted and called all sorts of names, but just like Barb, my only intention is to help the tortoises of the world lead better, healthier lives. There is no semester on tortoise care in vet school. Even if your vet is a casual tortoise keeper, there is tremendously high likelihood that your vet has read, learned from, and is now also parroting all the same old wrong info that we here are fighting against. The vast majority of the time vets give bad advice and offer harmful treatments. They just don't know what they don't know, and what they do know is wrong because they got that info from the same old wrong sources that everyone else gets it from. I've been working with many 'reptile" vets since the mid 80s. Its been my job to do so, and I have much more interaction with them than anyone normally would. I've met a few that were amazing and really know their stuff, but most know little to nothing about tortoise care. Even the ones that keep their own tortoises.

Looking at the ingredients, I don't think the Flukers is a good food to offer tortoises. I don't want you to be unhappy with us, or feel picked on, but we can't let incorrect info stand. Too many people read these threads. Wouldn't you do the same if someone on a dog forum was offering bad advice about what to feed their dog? If it was something you knew all about, but the person posting the bad info didn't know better? Wouldn't you speak up? I would.
As I said my Vet has tortoises, frogs, and other reptiles in his home and he will continue to be my adviser and doctor for Sally. I would never want to put her in any danger. She went through a period that she loved dandelions but this summer she does eat them. LOL. A lot of people don't know much about bonding and interacting with one. I must have an unusual Tortoise. But would not hurt her. I already have someone who will take her while am long gone.
 

Tom

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As I said my Vet has tortoises, frogs, and other reptiles in his home and he will continue to be my adviser and doctor for Sally. I would never want to put her in any danger. She went through a period that she loved dandelions but this summer she does eat them. LOL. A lot of people don't know much about bonding and interacting with one. I must have an unusual Tortoise. But would not hurt her. I already have someone who will take her while am long gone.
I read what you said about your vet. That is why I took the time to explain that most vets know nothing about tortoise care. It appears my message did not reach you.

No one thinks you want to harm your tortoise, and this has nothing to do with how bonded you are to your tortoise. This is only about helping you understand the nutritional needs of your tortoise. Lettuce and Fluker's food is not it.
 

Maggie3fan

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Hi Diane. No one wants to demean or embarrass you. Quite the contrary, we want to help you, and also help anyone reading this thread that doesn't know what to feed tortoises.

I'm sorry but somewhere along the way you've gotten the wrong info about what to feed your tortoise. Tortoises are highly adaptable. Russians in particular are exceptionally hardy and able to survive a lot. The sugars in fruits mess with their intestinal flora and fauna and cause problems. They won't drop dead from eating a bite of apple, but its not "good" for them. Sort of like smoking. Everyone knows it is bad for you, but many people smoke two packs a day and still live for decades.

Likewise, grocery store greens do not meet your tortoises nutritional needs very well. Some of them lack fiber, others have a poor calcium to phosphorous level, low calcium, and some contain deleterious compounds like goiterogens. Best to feed a wide variety broadleaf weeds, leaves, and flowers of the right types. If you must use grocery store greens because you can't get good weeds due to your climate or some other reason, then use grocery store greens, but favor endive and escarole as the main staples. Add in cilantro, arugula, collards, mustard and turnip greens, and a wide variety of others periodically. Squash leaves of any kind are great too. Along with these grocery store greens add in amendments to add fiber, calcium and variety. @Kapidolo Farms offers a wide variety of dried leaves and other stuff you can sprinkle on. @TylerStewart at Tortoisesupply.com offers a fantastic mix of dried flowers to use as a topper. You can also soak ZooMed pellets or Mazuri to add in and make the grocery store greens better. Grocery store greens can work as a last resort, but improve their nutritional value for a tortoise by adding the right variety of amendments to them.

Timothy hay is not a suitable food for Russian tortoises. They are not grass eaters. I have a bunch of tortoises that are grass eating species, and I avoid the Timothy hay because it is too stemmy. You can use soaked horse hay pellets made of Timothy hay to add fiber to grocery store greens for a Russian, and I do this, but this would really be the only capacity where it would be appropriate or useful to feed any kind of "hay" to a Russian tortoise.

You have not learned the hard way how little vets know about tortoise care. For that, I am glad. Same with some breeders, tortoise book authors, and other "reptile experts". The wrong diet and care info has been circulating and being parroted for decades. Here at TFO through a collaborative effort we've been figuring out what is wrong with all that old advice, and also what is right. This is why Barb jumped up to share the correct info with you in such an abrupt manner. I do the same thing sometimes and it just rubs some people the wrong way. I've been insulted and called all sorts of names, but just like Barb, my only intention is to help the tortoises of the world lead better, healthier lives. There is no semester on tortoise care in vet school. Even if your vet is a casual tortoise keeper, there is tremendously high likelihood that your vet has read, learned from, and is now also parroting all the same old wrong info that we here are fighting against. The vast majority of the time vets give bad advice and offer harmful treatments. They just don't know what they don't know, and what they do know is wrong because they got that info from the same old wrong sources that everyone else gets it from. I've been working with many 'reptile" vets since the mid 80s. Its been my job to do so, and I have much more interaction with them than anyone normally would. I've met a few that were amazing and really know their stuff, but most know little to nothing about tortoise care. Even the ones that keep their own tortoises.

Looking at the ingredients, I don't think the Flukers is a good food to offer tortoises. I don't want you to be unhappy with us, or feel picked on, but we can't let incorrect info stand. Too many people read these threads. Wouldn't you do the same if someone on a dog forum was offering bad advice about what to feed their dog? If it was something you knew all about, but the person posting the bad info didn't know better? Wouldn't you speak up? I would.
This is exactly the reason I am tired of newbies...sorry Tom...
 

Maggie3fan

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As I said my Vet has tortoises, frogs, and other reptiles in his home and he will continue to be my adviser and doctor for Sally. I would never want to put her in any danger. She went through a period that she loved dandelions but this summer she does eat them. LOL. A lot of people don't know much about bonding and interacting with one. I must have an unusual Tortoise. But would not hurt her. I already have someone who will take her while am long gone.
You are NOT understanding...you ARE hurting her with fruit...
 

Kipley

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AKC Breeder of Alaskan Malamute means I am an animal & reptile owner I would never give Sally something not appropriate or tell anyone it is a food I give Sally that would harm her or any one's beloved pet
And yet....you are.
 

Snoopy’s mom

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Again you Do Not Know what I also am giving Sally to eat!! You have to comment in a Demeaning Authoritaining manner!! But to show what you really are I will tell you Sally is fed vegetables, Timothy Hay, Fruits and you owe me an apology for insinuating I know nothing about Russian Tortoises. SHAME ON YOU!! Is this a forum that attacks people and ideas? Is this a forum that thinks they know more than other tortoise owners? You are totally in the wrong and making assumptions to what? Embarrass me???
Maybe you got this forum confused with Facebook?
 
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