Pancake Tortoise

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Tortoise Guy

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Hello. I am thinking about buying a tortoise. At first, I wanted a Russian Tortoise. After I realized they hibernate, I decided to think of a different tortoise to care for as I am afraid of hibernating incorrectly and do not want to risk it. Next, I thought of a Greek Tortoise. However, they too hibernate. Ate that, I thought of a Redfoot, however, they got (moderately) large and needed highish humidity I was not sure I could provide. After that, I thought of a sulcata, as they do not hibernate and humidity isn't a problem. However, they get quite large and I wouldn't be able to house them indoors during the colder months. After that, I thought of a Pancake Tortoise. They are relatively small and humidity is not a problem. My problem, though. If Pancakes appear to have easier care and maintenance, whe aren't they considered 'beginner tortoises' like Russian and Greek Tortoises. Anyone have any experience with them and can give me advice on their care and required supplies?
Thanks.
 

Gillian M

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Reading threads as well as care sheet of different species may help you choose the appropriate tort. Good luck, and of course a very warm welcome to the :tort: forum. Please let us know what species you choose.
 

CourtneyG

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They have low fertility rates so captive and wild caught are in low supply in the market. I have a few, young and juveniles do need humidity to help the shell stay smoith. I feed my cakes spring green mix with grassland and mazuri mix. They love slate stones that is set up to provide hides and climbing spaces. They do hibernate, but not like a russian, come winter time they slow down in eating and activity where you might not see them for a few days.
 

Grandpa Turtle 144

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You can bet i'll be watching this thread since I was thinking about getting one too!
I have had my pair for over a year and I love them but first who said you have to hibernate Russian or a Greek tort you can but there is no law that says you have to hibernate them . And it don't hurt them not to be hibernated . Yes I hibernate. Mine but with over 14 years with torts you don't have to . But good luck with your choice .
 

tortdad

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Hello. I am thinking about buying a tortoise. At first, I wanted a Russian Tortoise. After I realized they hibernate, I decided to think of a different tortoise to care for as I am afraid of hibernating incorrectly and do not want to risk it. Next, I thought of a Greek Tortoise. However, they too hibernate. Ate that, I thought of a Redfoot, however, they got (moderately) large and needed highish humidity I was not sure I could provide. After that, I thought of a sulcata, as they do not hibernate and humidity isn't a problem. However, they get quite large and I wouldn't be able to house them indoors during the colder months. After that, I thought of a Pancake Tortoise. They are relatively small and humidity is not a problem. My problem, though. If Pancakes appear to have easier care and maintenance, whe aren't they considered 'beginner tortoises' like Russian and Greek Tortoises. Anyone have any experience with them and can give me advice on their care and required supplies?
Thanks.
It's because pancakes cost some serious coin.

Next all baby and juvenile torts need humidity for proper shell growth.

Hibernating torts is not mandatory. All you need to do in the colder months is turn the lights on longer and bump the temps a few degrees. It tricks them into thinking is not winter so they don't hibernate.
 

Tidgy's Dad

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My little girl, who is a greek, never hibernates, nor do most of the captive kept Moroccan greek tortoises in their homeland, though those in the wild usually do for a few months.
If you keep them well fed and warm they sometimes become a bit dozy at the beginning of the winter, but soon perk up again.
I don't believe it does them any harm, though I have heard that if you're not careful it can cause an accelerated growth. But not sure if that's bad or not.
 
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