Redfoots humidity requirement

christinaland128

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I recently heard someone say that "Redfoots require no more humidity than other tortoises."

It just seems inaccurate to me since in the wild, their natural habitat ranges from savannah to forest-edges around the Amazon Basin. Basically tropical.

Perhaps some longitudinal study has proven otherwise, I haven't seen it.

Almost every single thing I've read leans towards yes more humidity.

Isn't it better for beginners to be a little over zealous in providing humidity for their torts? I just feel like it's better to be overly concerned then not.
 

FLINTUS

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Not sure where you read that. Depending on locality, I wouldn't keep constant 95%+, but they definitely need it over 70% most of the time, a bit higher when younger.
 

naturalman91

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i've heard a couple people say this myself but i don't agree i keep my humidity at a steady 80-85% humidity is just another one of those area's where people differ i have yet to hear it from someone i know for a fact know's what they're doing most of the time there is no credibility and when i ask for proof they give me a hard time so i chose the way that proof is provide not a desire to be right but as Flintus said as adults i've been told humidity while still needed isn't as huge of deal as with babies
 

FLINTUS

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The thing is, MOST-there are exceptions, as I said, depending on locality- Red Foots are not true forest tortoises, they come from the edge of the forests, where it is not as damp. Also, as another geographical extreme, go further south into the mountains, and you'll find them at humidity rarely over 70%, and much colder-some of them adapt to slow down during winter, couldn't quite call it hibernation though. Look at weather data for cities such as Manaus, effectively clearings in the rainforest. Now and again, the ambient humidity will drop into the 60%s in the morning before convectional rainfall in the afternoon, where humidity will go up to 90-95% easily. This can be replicated in captivity by a long misting. BUT, hatchlings will spend much more time in leaf litter, so they will have higher humidity.
 

christinaland128

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You know I really over worry about pyramiding! I've already tossed a ZooMed Reptile fogger out the door despite having contacted the company and fixed it twice. I'm waiting in a humidifier in the mail to make my own fogging system.

Now ONE of my reds likes to hide in the moist substrate most of the day AND he eats less. (The red one)

My other guy, the yellow Columbian, HE likes to go up top on the upper level in a half log most of the day and HE eats more. His shell has raised ridges. And I'm wondering if he's not getting enough humidity up top (he sleeps down below though.) or he's growing to fast. But is this early signs of pyramiding? See the red one seems smoother. I've had them since March and they've grown FAST. ImageUploadedByTortoise Forum1403645532.036883.jpg
 
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