risks of hibernation

pepsiandjac

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I have never hibernated my tortoises,just didn't feel confident enough,but was thinking of doing it next year.
But i have just been on facebook and can't believe how many people are saying their torts have died.most were doing fridge hibernations
So is it worth takinig the risk ,some say it,s good for them but can't be good if they going to die
 

Tom

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If done correctly it is fine. Many people make mistakes and don't lead into it or out of it well enough. Many people don't get them cold enough, or leave them outside or in a closet somewhere and the temperature fluctuates too much. It is easy to do if a few simple steps are followed.

I'm putting together a thread on this right now. It will be done in the spring time and you'll have it to refer to for next fall and winter.
 

WithLisa

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I've heard of some tortoises that have died because they dried out, froze,.. But I don't know anyone whose tortoise died during brumation without an obvious reason, so I don't think a correct brumation is a noteworthy risk.

But I've read an article by a german breeder who did a survey of fellow breeders and tortoise forum members. It showed, that nearly all deaths occurred in the fridge and basement. Coldframe/greenhouse seems to be the safest method, even though (or maybe because?) it has the most fluctuating temperature.
Of course it's not a professional research, but still an interesting result.
 

TortsNTurtles

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If done correctly it is fine. Many people make mistakes and don't lead into it or out of it well enough. Many people don't get them cold enough, or leave them outside or in a closet somewhere and the temperature fluctuates too much. It is easy to do if a few simple steps are followed.

I'm putting together a thread on this right now. It will be done in the spring time and you'll have it to refer to for next fall and winter.
I look forward to this future thread!
 

pepsiandjac

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If done correctly it is fine. Many people make mistakes and don't lead into it or out of it well enough. Many people don't get them cold enough, or leave them outside or in a closet somewhere and the temperature fluctuates too much. It is easy to do if a few simple steps are followed.

I'm putting together a thread on this right now. It will be done in the spring time and you'll have it to refer to for next fall and winter.
I'll def read that. I was wondering,since my torts are all in an insulated shed wouldnt it be easier to hibernate them in there,it should be just as easy to keep temps down and would seem more natural
 

Tim/Robin

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It is absolutely not necessary and there is very little room for error. In my opinion, the risks do not out weigh the benefit. What is the benefit?
 

Benjamin

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It is absolutely not necessary and there is very little room for error. In my opinion, the risks do not out weigh the benefit. What is the benefit?
It is necessary with some taxa for reproduction. I mainted cuora pani for years and found that hibernation was essential to get them to produce ova and subsequent hatchlings. Also several other SE Asian taxa I keep are allowed a dormant period during the winter with very successful results. Results only obtained when dormancy or hibernation is implemented.

Such stated, if reproduction is not a goal or the taxa reproduce without hibernation then it I would agree with your statement questioning the point.
 

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WithLisa

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It is absolutely not necessary and there is very little room for error. In my opinion, the risks do not out weigh the benefit. What is the benefit?
Outdoor enclosures are best for tortoises. A lot of space to exercise, grazing on weeds, basking in the sun,... What is the benfit of spending the whole winter indoors under dessicating heat bulbs, feeding on lettuce?

I know of many tortoises that got sick and died sooner or later because of wrong husbandry during winter in indoor enclosures. I know of very few that died because of wrong hiberation. So NOT hibernating seems far more risky to me, especially for a beginner.
But I guess it depends a lot on your location. In my climate it's not difficult at all to lead into hibernation. You just have to leave the tortoises in the outdoor enclosure until they start hibernating by themselves, then put them somewhere cold but frost-free, keep the substrate damp and wait for spring. That's it.
 

ascott

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I have never hibernated my tortoises,just didn't feel confident enough,but was thinking of doing it next year.
But i have just been on facebook and can't believe how many people are saying their torts have died.most were doing fridge hibernations
So is it worth takinig the risk ,some say it,s good for them but can't be good if they going to die


There are no guarantees in life whatsoever.....now, to allow/support a tortoise naturally designed to brumate is essential. "My feelings" on the subject is, if you are not going to educate yourself, if you are not going to do what you need to do to set the tort up all season with brumation in mind--then simply host a species of tortoise that is not designed to brumate..what is the big deal.....

If you host a species that is designed to brumate, then be sure to set up for that part of the species life cycle....again, just my opinion.
 
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