Sickle pod?

DoubleD1996!

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Can tortoises eat sickle pod leaves? I believe that's what this is. Or a soybean not sure.( I wake up to walk my dogs at 5am so it's dark)
 

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autumn_0201

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I'm sorry that I'm not able to give the real answer to this, but I think that to be on the safe side, it's best to not feed it to your tort. I think anything (except cactus and some other stuff) humans can't eat is not really suitable for torts either. This weed can't be consumed by humans, right? I heard it's sometimes called Arsenic weed, which kinda gives a hint that it's toxic.
 

DoubleD1996!

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I'm sorry that I'm not able to give the real answer to this, but I think that to be on the safe side, it's best to not feed it to your tort. I think anything (except cactus and some other stuff) humans can't eat is not really suitable for torts either. This weed can't be consumed by humans, right? I heard it's sometimes called Arsenic weed, which kinda gives a hint that it's toxic.
I heard it was used as a laxative
 

DoubleD1996!

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I'm sorry that I'm not able to give the real answer to this, but I think that to be on the safe side, it's best to not feed it to your tort. I think anything (except cactus and some other stuff) humans can't eat is not really suitable for torts either. This weed can't be consumed by humans, right? I heard it's sometimes called Arsenic weed, which kinda gives a hint that it's toxic.
 

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autumn_0201

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I heard it was used as a laxative

To make sure that it's the right plant, does it have a stalk up to 2 ½ feet (0.75 m.) high, and is it smooth, hairless, oval leaves and showy, buttercup-yellow flowers with five petals each, with long, sickle-shaped seed pods that develop from each flower after it matures? If yes, I found my information from here:

If not, then I'm sorry for not being able to help out ? but I hope you'll be able to have someone to help see if the sicklepod you're talking about can be ingested by tortoises or not! Either way, good luck with your question!
 

DoubleD1996!

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To make sure that it's the right plant, does it have a stalk up to 2 ½ feet (0.75 m.) high, and is it smooth, hairless, oval leaves and showy, buttercup-yellow flowers with five petals each, with long, sickle-shaped seed pods that develop from each flower after it matures? If yes, I found my information from here:

If not, then I'm sorry for not being able to help out ? but I hope you'll be able to have someone to help see if the sicklepod you're talking about can be ingested by tortoises or not! Either way, good luck with your question!
Thanks for the help.
 

RosemaryDW

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Senna is eaten by American desert tortoises. That said, I don’t see much in our forum about feeding it to other types or tortoises or its safety in general. That doesn’t mean it isn’t safe but I’d avoid it simply on the basis of having so little information.

What is “good” or bad for mammals often doesn’t apply to reptiles; our bodies don’t process things the same way. Nor do we have much research that is specific to tortoises. For that reason I search our forum to see what other experienced owners and breeders have to say about a plant before anything else. Often you’ll see that plants you might have heard as being very unsafe are fed all the time. :)
 

zovick

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Thanks for the help.
Further info from the above site mentions toxicity to livestock:

"Sicklepod weeds are especially unwelcome in agricultural row-crop situations. They impact crop yields when they grow in cotton, corn, and soybean fields. Sicklepod is also a bad thing to have growing in a pasture since it is toxic. Hay taken from pastures with sicklepod weed in them is of no use for livestock since they refuse to eat the contaminated hay. "
 

JMM

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There are many wild legumes (podded beans or peas or leaves/stems). Most are highly toxic. So it's best to avoid feeding all foraged or wild legumes unless they are ones like string beans meant human consumption as it can be difficult to differentiate the toxic vs. non-toxic species.
 
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