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Successful breeding of Cuora (Pyxidea) mouhotii

jonathan gray

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Five eggs were deposited here on 8 September 2017 and all five hatched between 22 - 26 December 2017. This is the third clutch in three years from this particular female. Her first clutch of six eggs yielded one successful hatch, the second clutch of five eggs yielded none and the third clutch of five eggs yielded five.022.JPG
 

jonathan gray

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There are three more eggs from a second female incubating now, scheduled to hatch next month. It was her first clutch -laid five, crushed two. The remaining three look good. Fingers crossed!
 

KevinGG

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Wow! Sell me some:)))! So nice to see when people get these guys settled. They seem to be reliable producers once they get acclimated and care is adjusted. Great job!
 

jonathan gray

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Wow! Sell me some:)))! So nice to see when people get these guys settled. They seem to be reliable producers once they get acclimated and care is adjusted. Great job!
The adults (3.5) were WC and arrived in varying degrees of debility; after many trips to the vet's and $$$ spent, I was left with 1.2. Although they have still retained some of their initial shyness, they are robust and heavy as bricks. They are also aggressive and cunning hunters: I saw the male ambush and devour a sparrow that dared to venture to drink from his soaking pool. Nothing was left, not a feather, not even a beak! They love large land snails, crunching them up like M&Ms. The first food I was able to tempt them with was pineapple(!)
 

cdmay

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The adults (3.5) were WC and arrived in varying degrees of debility; after many trips to the vet's and $$$ spent, I was left with 1.2. Although they have still retained some of their initial shyness, they are robust and heavy as bricks. They are also aggressive and cunning hunters: I saw the male ambush and devour a sparrow that dared to venture to drink from his soaking pool. Nothing was left, not a feather, not even a beak! They love large land snails, crunching them up like M&Ms. The first food I was able to tempt them with was pineapple(!)
Thanks for including the details of your group. Sadly, imported adults can be hard to acclimate but they are sure worth the effort if one has the patience...and a good vet.
 

jonathan gray

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Most excellent! If you’re ever interested in trading babies for different bloodlines let me know. Have 6 neonates hatched in September that are from 2 females wc.
Kelly, that sounds like a plan to me. I have no interest in selling these; I do, however, have interest in diversifying bloodlines. My question to you is this: how do you tell the difference between a C.m.m. and a C. m. obsti? I can post pictures of the adults, my CBB 3 year old and these new hatchlings. Perhaps you can help me figure out who's who and what's what.
 

tortadise

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Kelly, that sounds like a plan to me. I have no interest in selling these; I do, however, have interest in diversifying bloodlines. My question to you is this: how do you tell the difference between a C.m.m. and a C. m. obsti? I can post pictures of the adults, my CBB 3 year old and these new hatchlings. Perhaps you can help me figure out who's who and what's what.
Same here! At least for a couple of years of holding back offspring.

They have to stretch the necks out. Obsti will have stripes behind the eyes on the neck.
 

tortadise

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I’d these were part of the early to mid 2000s importation more than likely they are obsti from Vietnam origin. Mohoutii mohoutii have not come in quite a many decades on importation. Mohoutii mohoutii were coming in from northern and western territories. Obsti stay mainly in Vietnam and some portions of eastern Cambodia.
 

jonathan gray

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26166013_10212643141768181_1464755393521237681_n.jpg Four of the five hatchlings have eaten (chopped up earthworm and wax worms) and have been moved to the 'nursery'. I'll move baby #5 once I observe it eating. I also tossed in some of their eggshells for them to chomp on
 

tortadise

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View attachment 226460 Four of the five hatchlings have eaten (chopped up earthworm and wax worms) and have been moved to the 'nursery'. I'll move baby #5 once I observe it eating. I also tossed in some of their eggshells for them to chomp on
Excellent! Be for warned this species will bully each other heavily. Just keep an eye on them. We usually individually place neonates in Small tubs by themselves. Thts great they rare eating. They can be tough to start out.
 

jonathan gray

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Thanks for the heads up about their bullying; I've never raised more than one of these babies at a time. Could you post a picture of your set-up to give me an idea of what it looks like? N.B. It appears all the babies have begun to eat; it will be easier to monitor if the babies are each in their own container.
 

tortadise

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Thanks for the heads up about their bullying; I've never raised more than one of these babies at a time. Could you post a picture of your set-up to give me an idea of what it looks like? N.B. It appears all the babies have begun to eat; it will be easier to monitor if the babies are each in their own container.
Neither did we. Purchased 2 babies 3 years ago at a reptile show. One went downhill quick. Well the other was bullying it. Wee hours of the night. Quite nocturnal this species can be.
 

jonathan gray

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26230161_10212682751518400_7367507417702683568_n.jpg All five babies are eating and holding their own in their temporary nursery tank. There's a bit of scrapping during feeding time but otherwise they seem content to rest in the wet sphagnum and sleep.
 

jonathan gray

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I've been monitoring them very closely to keep an eye out for bullying and I haven't really observed any (and yes, I am obsessive enough to check on them several times during the night to make sure there's no nocturnal nastiness occurring). I wonder if, with five babies, their natural aggression is spread out so that one individual isn't singled out.
 
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