The reason behind my lack of involvement the past few months

tortadise

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Are you all moved now?
Yep all moved. I had to get an apartment in Dallas to keep working, I have 6 tanks and 3 aquariums in my room. You know for random purchases at reptile shows or relinquishments still from Dallas. The wave of spring turn overs has begun.
 

tortadise

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What species of ficus?
Not sure. Our newest friend Alvin is an arborist. I'll have him properly ID it.

So far he has Identified some very rare local species of trees on the park portion. This is most exciting as most of them are in the area in which I will create pathways and have labeling in the plants and grasses.

Tenoza-pithecellobium pallens
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Colima-zanthoxylum fagara
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Tepehuaje-Leucaena Pulverulenta
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Anaqua-ehretia anacua this tree is very very very cool. The tortoises love the blooms and flowers. It's a food for a tortoise beetle. It's a cool *** tree.
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Blue wood or Brasil tree-condalia lookeri
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Cordaen or wild olive tree-cordia boissieri
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Huisache-leguminosae fabaceae
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And black Willows-Salix nigra
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tortadise

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You need a body guard? I'd die for you.....

And all you'd need to do is let me live there!
Haha. I sure don't. But I would enjoy the company for sure. Your welcome anytime. Say a nice turtle from the rasaca(pond) keep in mind that 5 acres of the property are part of a 20+ acre pond or small lake. So lots of turtles. Funny too catching tilapia and fish in it for the big Mata Mata and reeves. Caught some plecos. They were devoured without the intent of being food. Anyways maybe you can ID this turtle properly. A very nice specimen.
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tortadise

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And here's the plecos caught that ended up
Being food unfortunately. Appeared to be 2-3 different species. Lovely fish. Wish they weren't eaten. Algae eaters are great in the turtle tanks.
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tortadise

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And can't forget some great photogenic turtles. Some serious baskers is an underestimate for these guys. I may seperate them. The other 4 seem to hide more. They're growing extremely rapid. The 350 is needing to be more like a 1000. Or outside in a pond ha.
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mike taylor

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Keep it coming Kelly ! I like reading about your start up projects .
 

Anthony P

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Swamps, bogs, and vernal pools
Man I love this thread...

Tough to tell for sure, but that turtle is definitely a Trachemys. A beautiful one, at that. Looks like it might be what is referred to as a Rio Grande Red Eared Slider. Not a different species, but certainly a locale specific variation in the species. That's the only place I can recall seeing those parallel yellow lines on the vertebral scutes, like that. A beautiful turtle. A photo of the head would have helped, but I'm about 70% sure that's what it is.
 

cdmay

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Man I love this thread...

Tough to tell for sure, but that turtle is definitely a Trachemys. A beautiful one, at that. Looks like it might be what is referred to as a Rio Grande Red Eared Slider. Not a different species, but certainly a locale specific variation in the species. That's the only place I can recall seeing those parallel yellow lines on the vertebral scutes, like that. A beautiful turtle. A photo of the head would have helped, but I'm about 70% sure that's what it is.
Agree with Anthony. Looks like the red-eared sliders I've encountered down in southern Texas where they are really well marked. Some are downright gorgeous Trachemys!
 

tortadise

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Man I love this thread...

Tough to tell for sure, but that turtle is definitely a Trachemys. A beautiful one, at that. Looks like it might be what is referred to as a Rio Grande Red Eared Slider. Not a different species, but certainly a locale specific variation in the species. That's the only place I can recall seeing those parallel yellow lines on the vertebral scutes, like that. A beautiful turtle. A photo of the head would have helped, but I'm about 70% sure that's what it is.
This is about the best I can do on the head shot. Unfortunately no plastron shot. A very nicely marked specimen for sure. Even if it is trachemys.
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tortadise

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This is typically how my mega construction threads start. From the dirt being moved.

Lovely neighbor helped me out with his skid steer and backhoe. Clearing the grub and stumps where the greenhouse will go.
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Here will
Be the parking lot for buses and some cars.
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And yes that is the greenhouse frame on the trailer.
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tortadise

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Do you have a drawn plan?
Yes indeed I do. I'll scan it in and upload it tomorrow at work. The structure will only house wood turtles, some Mata matas and spotted river turtles and the red/yellow foots. Maybe some poison dart frogs. Have to see what the temperature keeps first for them. But I've also put a deposit on some birds native to South America for this exhibit. Starting sith aracari. I use to keep keeled billed toucans when I was in high school and highly regret ever selling the 2 pairs I had. They're incredible birds.

Aracari are like a small toucan. Very bright and brilliantly stubborn and unique as much, just a tiny bit smaller.
 

tortadise

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This is an Aracari. One of many species(that will allow its size constraints of course) that will be free flight, free breed, and propogate the seeds and fruit within the Amazon greenhouse. This structure among the others that will be built in the future will be planted with 100% only native South American nurturing and thriving edible species of plant. Our new great friend Alvin the arborist that I mentioned is CITES permitted to obtain specimens of flora that are listed. Just so happened his farm, passion and clippings are all derived from central/South America. I want to prove and show a new form of conservation to the world. Teach it to children and people that mini ecosystems can thrive and learn from it. I'm a man of loving everything of this planet. But most zoos and institutions just use pretty plants and "eye candy" for enclosure appeals. I will not do that. Everything will be formidable to location, region and properly balanced for a true ex-situ ecosystem. Can't wait to see the results and research of this theory and mission I have.

Here a Aracari (for those not knowing) I plan to introduce once the house is completed(hopefully this summer) they forage on seeds and nuts and occasional insects.
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Markw84

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This is about the best I can do on the head shot. Unfortunately no plastron shot. A very nicely marked specimen for sure. Even if it is trachemys.
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That's what I've always seen referred to as an ornate red eared slider - a variation of the red ear where the central part of the carapace has those parallel markings.
 
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