They say its impossible (crab breeding)

DoubleD1996!

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After plenty of research of how to breed crabs in captivity, the most common answer I see is, "it's impossible." I wanted to try to breed a small species of freshwater crab I could feed to my turtles. I narrowed it down to a species I may be able to breed, regardless of opinions and research, I may be the first to do it. Everyone that knows me knows I like to do things naturally as possible. Enclosures, diet, etc. So I decided to try to build and replicate their natural enclosure outside and not interfere. Hopefully all goes well. I know I'll only be able to do this during the warmer parts of the year. I still have tons of research to do before then.
 

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Tom

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The reason it is "impossible", at least with most crab species is because there is a planktonic larval stage that is exceedingly difficult to duplicate in captivity.

The same is true for a lot of marine fish and some inverts too.

Good luck in your quest. Maybe you will be the one to figure it all out.
 

turtlesteve

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So a lot of “impossible” species with a larval stage have been bred by folks that are dedicated enough. Some fish are like this (surgeonfish / tangs) but are now being cultured to meet demand after fishing was banned in Hawaii. Also, an aquarist in Australia managed to spawn and raise giant clams (tridacna sp.) through the larval stage.

These situations require self-sustaining live cultures of multiple types of zooplankton, rotifers, etc. with different sizes to be able to feed the larvae.

Good luck!!!
 

DoubleD1996!

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So a lot of “impossible” species with a larval stage have been bred by folks that are dedicated enough. Some fish are like this (surgeonfish / tangs) but are now being cultured to meet demand after fishing was banned in Hawaii. Also, an aquarist in Australia managed to spawn and raise giant clams (tridacna sp.) through the larval stage.

These situations require self-sustaining live cultures of multiple types of zooplankton, rotifers, etc. with different sizes to be able to feed the larvae.

Good luck!!!
Thanks for the info
 

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