Tortoise table size for 2 stars?

Status
Not open for further replies.

samstar

New Member
5 Year Member
Joined
Oct 10, 2009
Messages
967
How big of a tortoise table should I build for my 2 stars? I was looking at 5ft x 3ft x 1.5ft. Is this big enough? I want to build something one time for the long run.
 

Shalon

New Member
5 Year Member
Joined
Aug 18, 2009
Messages
89
For my tortoise (a redfoot) I was told 1 square foot per inch of shell. So if I was you I would figure out how big stars get on average and go with that. I believe if you have more then that it is about 1 1/2 square feet per inch of shell. If i'm wrong someone will come along and let you know. :)
 

Millerlite

Well-Known Member
10 Year Member!
Joined
Nov 20, 2008
Messages
2,667
Location (City and/or State)
Southern Calif.
i always say go as big as you can go, male stars get 5-6 inches, females 7-8inches
 

Redfoot NERD

Well-Known Member
10 Year Member!
Joined
Dec 5, 2007
Messages
3,662
Location (City and/or State)
Tennessee
All of my tables are 32" wide [ you can get 3 ~ 32" x 4' panels from 1 ~ 4'x8' plywood/OSB 1/2" sheet ]

If you have a wall 12' long.. build a 32" x 12' table screwed to the wall in the corner.

Terry K
 

sammi

Member
10 Year Member!
Joined
Oct 3, 2009
Messages
677
Location (City and/or State)
San Diego, CA
samstar said:
I want to build something one time for the long run.

If you plan on keeping the same enclosure indefinitely your torts will probably get bored with it.
 

samstar

New Member
5 Year Member
Joined
Oct 10, 2009
Messages
967
Thanks for the replies friends. The minimum I will build is a 5x3x1.5ft. Will have to go back home later again to measure. I know the max I can go is 6ft in length.
 

samstar

New Member
5 Year Member
Joined
Oct 10, 2009
Messages
967
Ok so I spoke with the builder and he said that he will put a lacquer to smoothen out the surface just like the one in the attachment-tortoisetable. Now he also mentioned that the lacquer is safe and does not give our any chemicals. What do you guys have to say? I think I'll probably have this built in the next month or two.
 

GBtortoises

Well-Known Member
10 Year Member!
Joined
Feb 27, 2009
Messages
3,617
Location (City and/or State)
The Catskill Mountains of New York State
I've worked extensively with lacquer finishes (furniture building & floors). It does not emit any chemicals once fully cured but does give off noxious fumes while wet and in the process of curing. I've never used it as a finish with tortoise enclosures but I would recommend not exposing the tortoises to it or covering it with a substrate for 2-3 days at normal temperatures to allow it to fully cure. Even though lacquer is an extremely hard finish, it isn't going to hold up over time to constant claw marks and digging and it is very slippery. When the time comes to re-coat, which is going to be determined by the tortoises activity and your desire to have a nice finish, the old finish will need to be thouroughly washed and roughed up with sandpaper for a new top coat to properly adhere or it will flake. The work area needs to be very well ventilated. Using lacquer without proper ventilation can make you light headed and possibly sick to your stomach. And it's flammable when still wet.
 

samstar

New Member
5 Year Member
Joined
Oct 10, 2009
Messages
967
GBtortoises said:
I've worked extensively with lacquer finishes (furniture building & floors). It does not emit any chemicals once fully cured but does give off noxious fumes while wet and in the process of curing. I've never used it as a finish with tortoise enclosures but I would recommend not exposing the tortoises to it or covering it with a substrate for 2-3 days at normal temperatures to allow it to fully cure. Even though lacquer is an extremely hard finish, it isn't going to hold up over time to constant claw marks and digging and it is very slippery. When the time comes to re-coat, which is going to be determined by the tortoises activity and your desire to have a nice finish, the old finish will need to be thouroughly washed and roughed up with sandpaper for a new top coat to properly adhere or it will flake. The work area needs to be very well ventilated. Using lacquer without proper ventilation can make you light headed and possibly sick to your stomach. And it's flammable when still wet.

Ok thanks for your input, I will only laquer the outside. I rather play safe.
 

GBtortoises

Well-Known Member
10 Year Member!
Joined
Feb 27, 2009
Messages
3,617
Location (City and/or State)
The Catskill Mountains of New York State
The lacquer finish isn't going harm your tortoises in anyway once it has fully cured, it doesn't give off any type of fumes or solid matter once fully cured, only while "wet". It is a good hard finish, but it is also slippery and will eventually show scratches and dig marks. Alot of people here seem to use different types of plastic liners and tarps to line the interior of their enclosures. Different things work for different people. For 25 years I have used light colored usually an off white), good quality semi-gloss latex enamel or alkyd enamel paint with great success. I have found them to be easy to wipe clean, scrub if necessary (although very little sticks to them) and easy to repaint when needed which for me has been about every 5 years. No fumes, easy to use, clean up and available in any hardware store or home center. The light colors also provide good light reflection which helps lighten the interiors up even more. I let them cure for a few days after painting only because the finish is a bit soft until it's fully dried. I use it with equal success in enclosures for adults, young, humid & dry. I wasn't trying to steer you away from lacquer. It is a good, strong, longlasting finish, just a bit more mess and a little more involved to work with as a product.

samstar said:
GBtortoises said:
I've worked extensively with lacquer finishes (furniture building & floors). It does not emit any chemicals once fully cured but does give off noxious fumes while wet and in the process of curing. I've never used it as a finish with tortoise enclosures but I would recommend not exposing the tortoises to it or covering it with a substrate for 2-3 days at normal temperatures to allow it to fully cure. Even though lacquer is an extremely hard finish, it isn't going to hold up over time to constant claw marks and digging and it is very slippery. When the time comes to re-coat, which is going to be determined by the tortoises activity and your desire to have a nice finish, the old finish will need to be thouroughly washed and roughed up with sandpaper for a new top coat to properly adhere or it will flake. The work area needs to be very well ventilated. Using lacquer without proper ventilation can make you light headed and possibly sick to your stomach. And it's flammable when still wet.

Ok thanks for your input, I will only laquer the outside. I rather play safe.
 

tortoisenerd

Active Member
5 Year Member
Joined
Dec 18, 2008
Messages
3,957
Location (City and/or State)
Washington
I would go as big as you have space for and block off most of it for now, slowly increasing it in size and redecorating it as the torts grow. Right now that sounds like the minimum I'd do. If you have 6 ft and can still get it in the house/car, then why not use it?
 

samstar

New Member
5 Year Member
Joined
Oct 10, 2009
Messages
967
Yup, most probably leaning towards a 6 footer. Will have to discuss with my builder on how exactly I want it done or designed.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

New Posts

Top