Two 40+ year female Negev Tortoises

Trojan_48

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So after lots of research and help from others in this forum, I’ve come to the conclusion I have some pretty special pure Negev Tortoises. Yes they are considered in the Egyptian (kleinmanni) family.

Please share any further thoughts or info on them please. Both doing well and eating. They were imported over 30yrs ago and I was lucky enough to come across both

11C3EDFF-8D1C-4B54-B643-64A3B5D8AA35.jpeg 8F5B1065-DCBE-41CA-AF19-9F04F83BB806.jpeg 47B8B65F-0AAD-412D-A8C8-EFA9A7337BCE.jpeg 94E30453-B6ED-4676-8C76-2EDFAF9BDE2E.jpeg B39284CA-A564-4CB2-B8A8-0237C656C345.jpeg
 

G-stars

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Tell us more, like are they a breeding pair? How long have you had them for? How can you distinguish them from a “regular” Egyptian tortoise?
 

Trojan_48

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Are You suggesting they are from a specific part of the range of Testudo kleinmanni or a different species?
They are specific to the Negev desert in southern Israel. Scientific name is Testudu Werneri. Took me a while to really research them as they had no chevrons and the color difference from typical Kleinmanni’s.

Personally trying to reach out in the forum for more info on them or if anyone has a 100% Negev imported male. These are both female
 

wellington

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I would get them off those stones before they swallow them and get block and die. Also tortoises should not live in pairs so separate them.
If they really are that special and pure you will want to do the best for them to keep them healthy.
 

Trojan_48

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Tell us more, like are they a breeding pair? How long have you had them for? How can you distinguish them from a “regular” Egyptian tortoise?
These are both female from what I see and know. Never been breed. Imported by the original owner 30-34yrs ago he remembers. Had them since then and estimates them at 40+. So now I feel they are around 43-44yrs

hope to get more info on them or experience from others in them. Chris Leone from GardenStateTortoise has been giving me some good knowledge from his experience with the pair he has. To his knowledge the only other pure that old he knows of here.
 

Trojan_48

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I would get them off those stones before they swallow them and get block and die. Also tortoises should not live in pairs so separate them.
If they really are that special and pure you will want to do the best for them to keep them healthy.
Umm... it’s oyster shell, it’s fine with soil and sand on the bottom. Also they are both female. =)
 

Yvonne G

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I would get them off those stones before they swallow them and get block and die. Also tortoises should not live in pairs so separate them.
If they really are that special and pure you will want to do the best for them to keep them healthy.
This and oyster shell are common substrate for Kleinmanni
 

wellington

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This and oyster shell are common substrate for Kleinmanni
But in captivity and only that available I would worry about them eating it. Do they live only on that in the wild?
The restrictive enclosure size and only one substrate available, I would make adjustments. Larger or crushed would be much safer in captivity.
 

Trojan_48

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But in captivity and only that available I would worry about them eating it. Do they live only on that in the wild?
The restrictive enclosure size and only one substrate available, I would make adjustments. Larger or crushed would be much safer in captivity.
I do appreciate your concern. These have been in captivity over 35yrs in this mixed substrate.
But like I said, there is top soil, sand mix under and also an area with it. They have been happy in that area but may open up the other side depending if I get a male or not. Been waiting and talking w other experts I know before I open it up. (Same reasoning as mentioned above in regards to males).
Either way not posting for husbandry tips as I’ve done so much and have experience with them. Just looking for more specific info on the Negev themselves, breeding, etc.
 

wellington

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I do appreciate your concern. These have been in captivity over 35yrs in this mixed substrate.
But like I said, there is top soil, sand mix under and also an area with it. They have been happy in that area but may open up the other side depending if I get a male or not. Been waiting and talking w other experts I know before I open it up. (Same reasoning as mentioned above in regards to males).
Either way not posting for husbandry tips as I’ve done so much and have experience with them. Just looking for more specific info on the Negev themselves, breeding, etc.
That's fine. Many don't take into consideration the size difference from the wild to a small enclosure or possibly the enclosure they came from to what the new owner are housing them. 35 years ago a whole lot of bad stuff was done and not everyone has been willing to change.
If you will notice, my first post was before anything mentioned about you working with garden state for care info. I have no idea about you or if you know what your doing or not and I see white stones, which I would never use for any tortoise in a small enclosure.
Glad you have found garden state. Good luck with them.
 

Kapidolo Farms

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I fully understand your wanting to keep to region specific animals, perhaps WC as well. Those are two difficult criteria to meet. Even finding a WC male from anywhere might be a tough task.

There are several in the US, but I believe their pedigrees are pretty muddled.
 

Trojan_48

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I fully understand your wanting to keep to region specific animals, perhaps WC as well. Those are two difficult criteria to meet. Even finding a WC male from anywhere might be a tough task.

There are several in the US, but I believe their pedigrees are pretty muddled.
Yes, that’s what Chris told me. Well hopefully either I find one, would love these ladies to get some action and hopefully enjoy the fruits of egg laying 😂😊
 

PA2019

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They are specific to the Negev desert in southern Israel. Scientific name is Testudu Werneri. Took me a while to really research them as they had no chevrons and the color difference from typical Kleinmanni’s.

Personally trying to reach out in the forum for more info on them or if anyone has a 100% Negev imported male. These are both female
Very cool, never heard of this testudo group before. Thanks for sharing!
 

ShirleyTX

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@wellington
Oyster shell is calcium. It is food grade and edible. Chickens eat it to harden egg shells.

It allows a good grip for the Egyptian and makes it possible to humidify without the tort ever having wet feet.

In the wild, Egyptians live on a calcium-based sandy substrate.

My Egyptians have eaten the oyster shell before. It is dissolved in the gut. I have vet x-rays that confirm this.
 

wellington

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@wellington
Oyster shell is calcium. It is food grade and edible. Chickens eat it to harden egg shells.

It allows a good grip for the Egyptian and makes it possible to humidify without the tort ever having wet feet.

In the wild, Egyptians live on a calcium-based sandy substrate.

My Egyptians have eaten the oyster shell before. It is dissolved in the gut. I have vet x-rays that confirm this.
I do know what oyster shell does. I have chickens and they have it. Oyster shell also looks like white stones/rocks unless stated what it is. In the original post it didnt say it was oyster. Dont know this person and rocks are not an acceptable substrate specially white as tortoises tend to want to eat anything red or white. An over abundance of calcium is not good.
I get it and got it. I still wouldn't do it this same way. To each their own dont need any more explaining. I don't own this species and never will.
 

Trojan_48

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I do know what oyster shell does. I have chickens and they have it. Oyster shell also looks like white stones/rocks unless stated what it is. In the original post it didnt say it was oyster. Dont know this person and rocks are not an acceptable substrate specially white as tortoises tend to want to eat anything red or white. An over abundance of calcium is not good.
I get it and got it. I still wouldn't do it this same way. To each their own dont need any more explaining. I don't own this species and never will.
Just wanted to say I appreciate your opinion and response of care bud. I stopped responding as it kind of got out of hand with later comments. Haha. But just wanted to say that n everyone keep healthy and keep happy! =)

maybe feed our tort’s n watch them smile
 
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