What about cinder blocks?

Moozillion

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I am planning an outdoor daytime enclosure (20' x 20') for my Hermann's, Elsa. It will be open on top and will just be a wall around her current secure enclosure (which is 8' x 12', and is closed on top). She gets locked in her secure enclosure at night to keep her safe from rats, raccoons and coyotes. I am currently considering just laying cinder blocks in place without any mortar or anything. Elsa is 6.5" long and weighs about 2 pounds; a cinderblock is 8" x8" x16" and weighs 30 pounds.

Since she's a Hermann's, and not inclined to ram, climb, dig or push things that much, do you think this will be OK?
 

Tom

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This is what I have been using to house tortoises since the early 90's. It works great. I go two bricks high for most species, and three for adult sulcatas. Buy some half blocks too and offset your rows for more stability. Rounding off the corners and stacking the blocks so the top ones slightly overhang into the enclosure helps to prevent any escape attempts.

I also prefer slumpstone block to cinderblock. It costs more, but I find it much more appealing to the eye.
 

Moozillion

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Oh NOOOO!!! I accidentally posted this in the wrong section! This is NOT a breeding question!!!!

Oh, Moderators: can someone PLEEEASE move this to the Enclosure area??? My bad!!!:(
Sorry!
Moozillion


Tom said:
This is what I have been using to house tortoises since the early 90's. It works great. I go two bricks high for most species, and three for adult sulcatas. Buy some half blocks too and offset your rows for more stability. Rounding off the corners and stacking the blocks so the top ones slightly overhang into the enclosure helps to prevent any escape attempts.

I also prefer slumpstone block to cinderblock. It costs more, but I find it much more appealing to the eye.

Thanks, Tom! :)
 

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