What's in that leaf, grocery and garden, published nutrient list.

Yvonne G

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I have a thin leopard tortoise that doesn't seem to eat his share, so I've started setting him up by himself, out of sight of the others in his yard. I'm going to buy some bee pollen and see if it encourages him to eat any better. I'll keep you informed.
 

Srmcclure

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I have a thin leopard tortoise that doesn't seem to eat his share, so I've started setting him up by himself, out of sight of the others in his yard. I'm going to buy some bee pollen and see if it encourages him to eat any better. I'll keep you informed.
Hey Yvonne! Any luck with that pollen. I have it for my beardie and didn't know if my redfoot would like it too. She eats well, but extra nutrients are always nice ?
 

Yvonne G

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Hey Yvonne! Any luck with that pollen. I have it for my beardie and didn't know if my redfoot would like it too. She eats well, but extra nutrients are always nice ?
No, the tortoise died before it had time to do anything for him.
 

Kapidolo Farms

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Do you have info for Bougainvillea leaves/flowers?

Hi Camo,

I just saw this today. None of my regular go to webpages list this plant as edible. It is considered mildly toxic to people and mammal pets. With the different species living so broadly in south America you'd think that at least some of the wild type diet lists would list is as food for one of the south American species of tortoise.

I found this which does not address these plants as food for tortoises, but offer some idea that a few leaves if ingested will probably not be a horrible situation.


Bougainvillea Genus: A Review on Phytochemistry, Pharmacology, and Toxicology​

Rodolfo Abarca-Vargas 1, Vera L Petricevich 1
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Free PMC article

Abstract​

This review discusses the current knowledge of the phytochemistry and in vitro and in vivo evaluations carried out using the extracts and, where appropriate, the main active components isolated from the genus Bougainvillea. Out of 18 species, most phytochemical, pharmacological, and toxicological studies focused on four species with different cultivars and one hybrid. Some plants are used for the treatment of various health disorders. Numerous phytochemical investigations of plants in this genus confirm the presence of aliphatic hydrocarbons, fatty acids, fatty alcohols, volatile compounds, phenolic compounds, peltogynoids, flavonoids, phytosterols, terpenes, carbohydrates, and betalains. Various studies have confirmed that these extracts or active substances that were isolated from the genus Bougainvillea have multiple pharmacological activities. Some species of Bougainvillea have emerged as sources of traditional medicine in human health. More studies of the phytochemical, pharmacological, and toxicological properties and their mechanisms of action, safety, and efficacy in all Bougainvillea species, cultivars, and hybrids are advisable for future research.

here is another that gives a basic shoulder shrug as to toxicity...

It works better to get a response out of me by doing this @Kapidolo Farms
 
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