Yes again… maturing?

Grace-Sophia

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 9, 2021
Messages
520
Location (City and/or State)
Texas
Hey all! I know I know, I posted about this before but I think that my male/females Herman tortoise has matured. I would really like to figure out what it is just that I know lol. Over the course of the last few months it has been developing some more millet characteristics a longer tale and a more of a separation in between scoots. I will really try to not post about this again but if anyone could help me on this please do. Thank y’all so much share some attached photos -

Male or female- what’s your vote?
 

Attachments

  • 0BC213D9-62FC-4DAE-A9DF-A48455F146EE.jpeg
    0BC213D9-62FC-4DAE-A9DF-A48455F146EE.jpeg
    1.8 MB · Views: 5
  • B9E0EAE0-01DA-4360-BD04-84A043A90932.jpeg
    B9E0EAE0-01DA-4360-BD04-84A043A90932.jpeg
    1.9 MB · Views: 5
  • FD76BD09-9815-470F-AB01-7D8DD199CDD8.jpeg
    FD76BD09-9815-470F-AB01-7D8DD199CDD8.jpeg
    1.8 MB · Views: 5
  • B0C5AB2F-327B-45AD-8D8D-77E974E03E9E.jpeg
    B0C5AB2F-327B-45AD-8D8D-77E974E03E9E.jpeg
    1.7 MB · Views: 5

zolasmum

Well-Known Member
5 Year Member
Joined
May 19, 2015
Messages
917
Hey all! I know I know, I posted about this before but I think that my male/females Herman tortoise has matured. I would really like to figure out what it is just that I know lol. Over the course of the last few months it has been developing some more millet characteristics a longer tale and a more of a separation in between scoots. I will really try to not post about this again but if anyone could help me on this please do. Thank y’all so much share some attached photos -

Male or female- what’s your vote?
I would say your tortoise is female - our male Hermann has a much larger and longer tail, which he usually holds sideways - but I'm not an expert. He/she looks a bright little chap, anyway.
Angie
 

Grace-Sophia

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 9, 2021
Messages
520
Location (City and/or State)
Texas
I would say your tortoise is female - our male Hermann has a much larger and longer tail, which he usually holds sideways - but I'm not an expert. He/she looks a bright little chap, anyway.
Angie
Thank you 😊


Here is a photo from another one of my threads that she was in the beginning of last year- safe to say she’s changed alot!
 

Attachments

  • 28916392-C830-43A0-859E-1591D59D97A1.png
    28916392-C830-43A0-859E-1591D59D97A1.png
    427.8 KB · Views: 4

Cathie G

Well-Known Member
Platinum Tortoise Club
Joined
Aug 9, 2018
Messages
10,492
Location (City and/or State)
Lancaster
I'm voting female also... just because of the short fat tail with the somewhat formed Phillips asterick but I'm not even an expat let alone an expert 🤗
 

Grace-Sophia

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 9, 2021
Messages
520
Location (City and/or State)
Texas
I did forget to mention that she has a brother (shown me he is male) supposedly from the same clutch of eggs.
Doesn’t incubation temp determine sex?
 

Markw84

Well-Known Member
10 Year Member!
Platinum Tortoise Club
Joined
Jan 17, 2012
Messages
4,788
Location (City and/or State)
Sacramento, CA (Central Valley)
I did forget to mention that she has a brother (shown me he is male) supposedly from the same clutch of eggs.
Doesn’t incubation temp determine sex?
Yes, but it is a ratio of the odds that changes with temperature. For example, with domed Galapagos the pivot point is probably about 84°. That means at that temperature of incubation you should get about 50% males and 50% females. That is if you incubate at exactly that temperature and the temperature us constant throughout incubation and day/night. If you incubate at 83°, you should get about 66% males and 33% females. At 81° you will approach 90%+ males. If you go much lower, you start risking a much lower hatch rate and affecting hatchling vitality. The reverse is true with temperatures above 84° with the ratios of females increasing.

So it is not an all or nothing situation unless you want to flirt with no development at lower end (<80°) and high mortality and deformity at the higher end (>89°).

Therefore, if I were to "incubate for female" I would use a temperature that would yeild mostly female, but still expect some males. The more to the 90% probability you want to go, the more you risk getting healthy babies.
 

zovick

Well-Known Member
5 Year Member
Joined
Nov 17, 2013
Messages
2,304
The pix in post #1 seem to show a female tortoise, IMHO.

The known male brother coming from the same clutch of eggs does not necessarily mean ALL the babies from that clutch will be males. At some incubation temperatures, both sexes might be produced.
 
Top