Live naked people

Kapidolo Farms

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So many folks post images of feces hoping for help in diet adjustment, clinical direction, or out of some latent $hit fetish?

This is a wonderfully formed dump from an adult Kinixys erosa. It has taken awhile of diet component adjustment to have them produce such wonderful turds, butt here you have in all its glory - a well formed forest Kinixys poop
20180214_063815.jpg
 

Kapidolo Farms

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I don't know why one image got flipped? These guys are on their backs to hold still long enough to manage my phone, the PIT tag reader, and the scale. These are the two being offered. One is already sold. They are essentially identical. 20180320_062834.jpg


wills picture.jpg
 

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Kapidolo Farms

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Both the x-rays were taken in early April as you can see on the x-ray, Phae is already with fully developed eggs and Medea is not there, some egg shadow can be seen. 2nd week of April with Phae on and off the nest mound I gave her oxytocin, after a few days of elevated calcium intake. She did not lay any, time to just wait it out.

Medea took over the nest mound as Phae abandon it, yet Darth was still staying clear of Phae. Media abandon the nest mound and started dribbling eggs out, so I gave her oxytocin and she dropped many eggs. Darth started mating with Medea alot, but was still leaving Phae alone.

Phae still did not drop eggs. I tried the oxytocin on her again, and not eggs. A few days later she started dribbling eggs out and I gathered many up including that weird indented one at about 9 o:clock in the xray. That is the last of the three images. There is a rope of calcium attached to it, several of her eggs were like that, yet that does not appear on the x-ray as best as I can tell.

I am left to wonder if the rope formed after the xray, or was somehow preventing her from laying the eggs, as they could have been attached to each other. At least three eggs came out that were attached to each other.

At this point I am convinced they need a somewhat higher ambient humidity and worth to lay than my current setup provides. I'm thinking a larger heated nght house with misting and a greenhouse roof is needed.

Darth is now busy with Phae. It seems their behavior to each other clears time of the boot knocking schedule to let the females lay eggs.
 

wellington

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IMG_3331.PNG IMG_3332.PNG Will I thought these two pics I took from the first X-ray pic might have been the odd egg pictured?
In my first pic the darkest egg seems to have a stem. The second pic there is the odd shaped egg right in the center looking to be getting squashed and also has a little stem part top side.
Could these be the odd eggs or just shadowing?
 

Kapidolo Farms

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That's really cool @wellington . However I still don't feel comfortable reading the x-ray that well. That multiple indent egg in your second blow-up is the weird egg from my phone image. She is still pooping out eggs and I'm still making several trips through the enclosure a day to get them and place them in the incubator. I hope I get some to hatch.
 

Kapidolo Farms

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Food Items Quality

I buy in bulk to get low prices and re-sell for a lower price than is often found for small quantities offered by other vendors. I use all the food items that I sell, so turnover if high, nothing is sitting around for very long before it ends up with you. I keep small quantities of every purchase stored as I would expect most buyers would store them (as directed on the package) so I can see their 'shelf life'.

I am NOT a USDA certified provider or processor of organic pet foods.

I buy what is packaged as USDA certified organic diet items for human consumption and resell them for animal consumption. I am NOT a USDA certified re-packaging facility so I can not claim the items are USDA certified in the package that you have purchased. However I do not alter the items in any way, shape, or form, that would cause the integrity of the food item to not carry the quality of the original supplier. Some items I may package with moisture and/or oxygen packs to maintain freshness for extended periods of storage time.

Some items are acquired while the producer is transitioning from a non-organic growing system to an approved organic system. This will be mentioned in the description when posted for sale and/or on the packaging that holds the diet item.

Some items I produce myself and I do so adhering to the principles and rules that govern organic farming systems. This will be in the description when posted for sale and/or on the packaging that holds the diet item.

I uncovered this issue while searching out to create a wholly USDA certified organic tortoise food. There are many strange perceptions even in the Organic Foods 'realm'.

I approached a few certification vendors and got this one response "Thank you for contacting CCOF. From an organic certification perspective, products considered “pet food” and “pet treats” are different. We do not certify pet food because the organic requirements conflict with the AAFCO requirements for pet food. We do certify pet treats made with agricultural ingredients. Below is basic information on the requirements for pet treats. . I’ve attached the National Organic Standards along with information on CCOF’s services." CCOF did not know what pets I was seeking to make food for, nor did they ask.

CCOF is one USDA approved compliance and certification company that operates in California, there are others. There are indeed many certified organic dog and cats foods in many stores. This certification company, CCOF, has decided to not do this kind of certification. AAFCO is https://www.aafco.org/ Associated of American Feed Control officials.

Livestock feed has a whole section for organic, as what the livestock is fed effects whether the resulting meat, eggs, or dairy can be certified organic. Tortoises are pets, not livestock.

I have sorted out a tortoise feed that has no grain or grain by-products, has a 20:1 C: P ratio and I have grown some holdback leo's with it. More work to do to make a it available.
 

MichaelaW

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Food Items Quality

I buy in bulk to get low prices and re-sell for a lower price than is often found for small quantities offered by other vendors. I use all the food items that I sell, so turnover if high, nothing is sitting around for very long before it ends up with you. I keep small quantities of every purchase stored as I would expect most buyers would store them (as directed on the package) so I can see their 'shelf life'.

I am NOT a USDA certified provider or processor of organic pet foods.

I buy what is packaged as USDA certified organic diet items for human consumption and resell them for animal consumption. I am NOT a USDA certified re-packaging facility so I can not claim the items are USDA certified in the package that you have purchased. However I do not alter the items in any way, shape, or form, that would cause the integrity of the food item to not carry the quality of the original supplier. Some items I may package with moisture and/or oxygen packs to maintain freshness for extended periods of storage time.

Some items are acquired while the producer is transitioning from a non-organic growing system to an approved organic system. This will be mentioned in the description when posted for sale and/or on the packaging that holds the diet item.

Some items I produce myself and I do so adhering to the principles and rules that govern organic farming systems. This will be in the description when posted for sale and/or on the packaging that holds the diet item.

I uncovered this issue while searching out to create a wholly USDA certified organic tortoise food. There are many strange perceptions even in the Organic Foods 'realm'.

I approached a few certification vendors and got this one response "Thank you for contacting CCOF. From an organic certification perspective, products considered “pet food” and “pet treats” are different. We do not certify pet food because the organic requirements conflict with the AAFCO requirements for pet food. We do certify pet treats made with agricultural ingredients. Below is basic information on the requirements for pet treats. . I’ve attached the National Organic Standards along with information on CCOF’s services." CCOF did not know what pets I was seeking to make food for, nor did they ask.

CCOF is one USDA approved compliance and certification company that operates in California, there are others. There are indeed many certified organic dog and cats foods in many stores. This certification company, CCOF, has decided to not do this kind of certification. AAFCO is https://www.aafco.org/ Associated of American Feed Control officials.

Livestock feed has a whole section for organic, as what the livestock is fed effects whether the resulting meat, eggs, or dairy can be certified organic. Tortoises are pets, not livestock.

I have sorted out a tortoise feed that has no grain or grain by-products, has a 20:1 C: P ratio and I have grown some holdback leo's with it. More work to do to make a it available.
Awesome, Will! I will be following this with great interest.
 

Kapidolo Farms

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https://tortoiseforum.org/threads/forstens-conservation-is-on-going.167939/


Conservation Efforts to Protect Endangered Turtles of Sulawesi

Lab Note #15 by Christine Light ● Like?

Project Update!
The project has continued to move forward over the last year! We did have some setbacks, including delays in getting the Indonesian research permit which resulted in personnel changes. Because of these delays, Andrea Currylow had other commitments that she needed to focus on she was unable to continue as the Project Field Coordinator. But I am happy to say that Angela Simms, who is a PhD Candidate at Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia has recently joined the team and will head up Field Operations. We were approved for the research permit in January 2018 and we began population surveys in March and they continued through the end of April. We are heading back in September to continue population surveys and to begin work on the captive breeding program at Tadulako University. Please say tuned for more Project Updates and also please check out and "like" the project's FB page https://www.facebook.com/SulawesiChelonianConservation/
 

maggie3fan

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I also bit on the naked people tickle. But I semi know Will and kinda didn't buy it. Plus my sister has GREAT carpenter skills. I am glad for you Will, I know the long trip you made to get where you are.
 

Kapidolo Farms

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This is Sam. He was a pet to Julian Duvall, the soon to retire President/CEO of the San Diego Botancial Gardens. WAS his pet in the early 1960's and is his pet again. Sam spent 40 years with another keeper in southern California when he outgrew the home that Julian grew up in. Their reunion was a fluke chance of fate.

One of the SDTTS meeting was the full story of Sam, and his caretakers over his life starting with his purchase for $50 as a neonate imported directly from the Galapagos.

Julian's wife, Leslie, wrote a children's book about it. "Too Big To Lose..." find it on Amazon. 20180812_155718.jpeg 20180812_155826.jpeg
 

Yvonne G

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One of the 2016 cohort holdbacks next to a 10 inch paper plate. NFS lets wait and see what sex they show, maybe a few more years. They are big enough, they'll go outside next year. Darth and Phae's nenotes. View attachment 248226
Just goes to show what the kind of diet Will feeds and the environment he keeps them in makes such a very big difference. This is a clutchmate of the above shown tortoise, at HALF THE SIZE!!!!!! (shown in a 10" plate):

Manouria aberrant scutes.jpg

I'm so embarrassed! I can't get another Vision cage too soon!!!!!
 

Kapidolo Farms

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Large herbivores must select food from a wide variety of plant parts, species, and strains. These differ in nutritional value (protein, carbohydrate, etc.), toughness, spinosity, etc. Even greater differences are found in types and concentrations of secondary compounds. Every plant produces its own set of secondary chemical compounds, which to a great extent are unique to it or its species. Ingestion of natural concentrations of these compounds can lead to either death or severe physiological impairment. The ubiquitous nature of these compounds would make herbivory impossible unless animals had mechanisms for degrading and excreting them. An animal displaying no obvious symptoms of poisoning is not free of the problem of ridding itself of toxic compounds; if it is eating plants, it almost certainly has this problem. Herbivores are capable of detoxifying and eliminating secondary compounds. Limitations of these mechanisms force mammalian herbivores to consume a variety of plant foods at any one time, to treat new foods with caution, to ingest small amounts on the first encounter, and to sample food continuously. Selection of foods is based on learning in response to adverse internal physiological effects, and herbivores probably cannot predict these from the smell or taste of new foods. Herbivores prefer to eat familiar foods and can seek out and consume foods that rectify specific nutritional deficiencies induced by detoxification. They should prefer to feed on foods that contain small amounts of secondary compounds, and their body size and searching strategies should be adapted to optimize the number of types of foods available with respect to the total amount of food that can be eaten and will be present in the future. Natural selection can increase the efficiency of degrading particular secondary compounds. Specialist herbivores, like koala and mountain viscacha, are expected where a large amount of several related toxic foods is present in a year-round supply. However, few large herbivores are specialized on such a restricted range of foods.

Strategies in Herbivory by Mammals: The Role of Plant Secondary Compounds

W. J. Freeland, and Daniel H. Janzen
The American Naturalist
Volume 108, Number 961 | May - Jun., 1974

In other words all plants have some kind of deleterious compounds in them and many animals that eat the plants have a way to make it not be deadly. It is what is sometimes called evolutionary warfare.
 
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ColaCarbonaria

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The first article made me think of 2 things and I don’t know if I’m even thinking in th right direction but pothos was one. I remember it being ‘toxic’ 20 years ago to being described more recently as an ‘irritant’ but clearly it does something for them because even fat, little well-fed jungle tortoises mow it down when it’s in their enclosure. Mushrooms also came to mind. I have very sandy soil and when I plant something I use a mix of top soil and mushroom compost. In addition to the nutrients the compost provides it also helps with keeping the nematodes away. So as crumby as mushrooms are nutritionally could they help herbivores battle some type of parasite bombardments? Don’t get me wrong I don’t think shrooms are a dewormer but maybe more of a Tums? Idk just thoughts. On the second article I registered w th site and it still wouldn’t give me the article. So I couldn’t read it, I’m sure it’s an operator error somehow.
 

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