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Cross breeding

Discussion in 'Tortoise Breeding' started by jjaymeza, Apr 15, 2018.

  1. jjaymeza

    jjaymeza Member

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    Just was curious is cross breeding a thing among tortoise species? Example: a Sulcata with a Galapagos or a cherry head with a yellow foot?
  2. Tom

    Tom The Dog Trainer 5 Year Member

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    It happens, but it shouldn't. Species should never be mixed.
  3. ohio

    ohio Active Member

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    It seems to be unacceptable in the tortoise community. Different bacterias, viruses, and keeping blood lines pure. Many subspecies within a species etc. I find it odd because hybrids are everywhere, domestic livestock, dogs, agriculture, etc. I myself think it would be cool to hybrid star torts to be more cold Hardy and handle northern climates and maybe even hibernate through winter months. Lol. I guess another factor would be fertility in the bastard offspring. Then waiting several years before they're able to be sexually mature. A long term long term project.
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  4. wellington

    wellington Well-Known Member Moderator 5 Year Member

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    I think cross breeding is a greed move! And should never be done. It's not to better anything but ones bank account.
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  5. wellington

    wellington Well-Known Member Moderator 5 Year Member

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    Bad ideas you have.
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  6. ohio

    ohio Active Member

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    Lol I don't plan to hybrid. I like keeping my species pure but if that was the case there would only be a handful of dog breeds. In nature sometimes things do naturally hybrid plants and animals. Also don't forget about the hopeless mate. When a mutation takes place in offspring and finds the rare anomaly mutant to mate with slowly creating a new species. Nature does it slowly, man makes it happen faster and on our terms.
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  7. Northeast Reptiles

    Northeast Reptiles Member

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    IMG_3276.jpg
    I recently adopted this Three Toed/Gulf Coast box turtle from a rescue. She came from a guy who kept both species together. Part of my adoption paperwork was a statement i had to sign saying that
    I would never let this turtle produce viable eggs. I should house him/her separately when he/she reaches breeding age. Or i have to destroy any eggs found if he/she accidentally breeds.
  8. ohio

    ohio Active Member

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    Nice looking turtle. How many toes? JK
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  9. jjaymeza

    jjaymeza Member

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    May I ask why that was in the adoption paperwork?
  10. NorCal tortoise guy

    NorCal tortoise guy Active Member

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    The thing about cross breeding dogs is they are all the same species were as the tortoises we are talking about are all differnt species
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  11. Yvonne G

    Yvonne G Old Timer TFO Admin 10 Year Member! Platinum Supporter

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    different dog breeds are all the same "canine" species. Different tortoises are different species. Apples and oranges.
  12. jjaymeza

    jjaymeza Member

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    Really wow that’s exciting but what about the different types of Galapagos tortoises for example their shells and some features are different. That’s the same species cause they can breed right?
  13. Pearly

    Pearly Well-Known Member

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    There is a place in Miami Beach called Jungle Island, they have a cross of tiger with a lion there- they call him „ liger” i know there are MANY other examples but thinkng of tortoises, if they somehow crossed paths breeding age male of one species with mature and receptive female of another that were right size for mating with each other.... would they even do it?!?? I mean- would they want to mate?!! Or are all those hybrids results of human meddling?
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  14. Yvonne G

    Yvonne G Old Timer TFO Admin 10 Year Member! Platinum Supporter

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    Yes, that's the same species and the resultant babies would be called intergrade.
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  15. Yvonne G

    Yvonne G Old Timer TFO Admin 10 Year Member! Platinum Supporter

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    When talking about the liger, they have discovered that In tigers, the males contribute the genes that limit growth and in lions, the females contribute those genes. So a female tiger bred to a male lion, grows bigger than it is supposed to because the limiting growth gene is not present. In my opinion, it's not right to "play god" this way. Who knows what other problems arise from mixing species.
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  16. Pearly

    Pearly Well-Known Member

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    Interesting! Didn’t know about that, but it explains why at Jungle Island they always brag about the size of that liger. He is really quite beautiful. But back to torts, do you think that different species would mate with each other / produce offspring in the wild, had their paths crossed for whatever reason? Or, iare we all programmed in nature to be attracted only to our own kind? Now, there are many deviations from that known to the human kind, but animals? I’d be very curious to hear some good stories from people who have „been around”
  17. Bambam1989

    Bambam1989 Well-Known Member

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    This topic makes me think of what has been reported in areas of Alaska and Canada. Male grizzly bears are breeding female polar bears, there have even been genetically verified "second generation" polar/grizzly bears found.
    This is an example of wild animals being forced into new areas by environmental changes. In this example though, grizzlies and polar bears are very similar in DNA and are able to produce fertile offspring.
    Tigers and lions are more genetically different than a polar bear and a grizzly though. These animals frequently are born with health problems, usually infertile, and need assistance (C-section) to be born because of their larger size. These animals wouldn't survive in the wild to reach sexual maturity, and then if they did, the likeliness of them being capable of producing a new generation would be slim.
    When you breed a horse and a donkey the resulting mule offspring is sterile due to the genetic differences.
    So, if two separate species of torts managed to find each other in the wild and had offspring would the resulting hatchlings be capable of surviving without the aid of human intervention? If they did survive would they be capable of reproduction?
    I haven't done any research on whether or not tort hybrids are fertile. I imagine the results would be very comparable to the liger.
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  18. jjaymeza

    jjaymeza Member

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    You definitely taught me something. That was an interesting read.
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  19. Yvonne G

    Yvonne G Old Timer TFO Admin 10 Year Member! Platinum Supporter

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    There are several different species of tortoise living in the same territory in South Africa, yet how often do we hear about or see any hybrid tortoises from there. . . just sayin'
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  20. Bambam1989

    Bambam1989 Well-Known Member

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    Yes. My point is that if two separate species were to mate the resulting eggs/hatchlings would probably not survive for very long. Possible anomalies in their development may cause them to be weaker, and more susceptible to illness. They would probably never hatch or quickly die and be eaten. The ingrained instinct most animals have to produce strong offspring probably plays a part in torts not naturally crossbreeding. Instinctually they know the offspring will be "defective".
    While some animal hybrids result in a hardier offspring (mules for example) the genetic differences still have side effects (mules are sterile).
    I'm sorry if my theory seems confusing, I lack the vocabulary and fluency to make it more understanding..
    Pearly and TechnoCheese like this.
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