Cypress Mulch v's Coco Coir??

bextort

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I have a Russian who was on sand when I bought her, kept her on sand for 3-4 weeks whilst she settled then swapped to coco coir. I followed the instructions regarding soaking the brick but even after a week I feel that it's too damp. Shelby buries herself instantly to the point where she doesn't come out to eat however I'm paranoid about shell rot with it being moist. Don't get me wrong it's not soaking but once I've dug her out her shell fells and looks different (maybe I'm being paranoid)

I've heard alot about cypress mulch, any advice/guidance or pro and cons? Should I stick with coco coir? Should it be a moist consistency still?
 

E5150

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Squeeze out the excess water and mix the coir with play sand (50/50 by volume). Cypress can cause problems with splinters.
 

Kapidolo Farms

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Hi,

From this web site http://startortoises.net/diet.html I thought it would be a good idea to try coco husk chips as in the image below. Orchid growers use then as well as "orchid" bark, which BTW is not the bark of an orchid, but rather bark orchids are grown in.

So, I bought some coco husk chips, and find them to be a good alternative, for cypress. I have had a lingering concern about cypress as it is often now a 'blended' wood product, without much more offered as disclosure on the bag than "Our product is cypress wood mulch blended with other hardwoods". There is also a popularly expressed concern for the sustainability of cypress as well.

The coco husk chips are sustainable for sure, they are a processed by-products of a food crop. The type I have purchased and used and am happy with is from here http://www.aurorainnovations.org/coco-chips.html . It is sanitized and rinsed to neutral pH, and holds water well.

It does not become muddy like the coir. The few fiber strings in it are so few, they give me no cause for concern.

Will
That image . . .
 

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wellington

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Also, do. It mix with sand at a 50/50 ratio. Sand cause impaction. Only about 20% can be sand. However, I would t use sand at all use wash at Will mentioned or plain dirt.
 
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