identification

Theo2002

Member
Joined
Nov 11, 2020
Messages
36
Location (City and/or State)
Hastings
There are loads of these growing in my local woods. I think they are Alexander’s but I’m not sure. Can anybody confirm this?

4C70A6D8-AA6F-48E7-A720-729EC58FFEC3.jpeg
 

Yvonne G

Old Timer
TFO Admin
10 Year Member!
Platinum Tortoise Club
Joined
Jan 23, 2008
Messages
93,381
Location (City and/or State)
Clovis, CA
It sort of looks like a wild strawberry, but I'm not sure.
 

Maro2Bear

Well-Known Member
5 Year Member
Joined
May 29, 2014
Messages
14,724
Location (City and/or State)
Glenn Dale, Maryland, USA
It sort of looks like a wild strawberry, but I'm not sure.

But the leaves are much too large Compared to “the hand”...

This pix in TheTortoiseTable does look like Alexanders

EADF470D-5E5A-49B3-BA4A-65E66E1D47E8.jpeg

  • Common Name: Alexanders (Horse Parsley, Smyrnium)
  • Latin Name: Smyrnium olusatrum, S. perfoliatum
  • Family Name: Umbelliferae/Apiaceae
No known hazards with this plant and would be fine as part of a varied diet for the tortoise enclosure.

One way to identify Alexanders is that a crushed or broken leaf or stem smells like celery.
 

Theo2002

Member
Joined
Nov 11, 2020
Messages
36
Location (City and/or State)
Hastings
But the leaves are much too large Compared to “the hand”...

This pix in TheTortoiseTable does look like Alexanders

View attachment 311636

  • Common Name: Alexanders (Horse Parsley, Smyrnium)
  • Latin Name: Smyrnium olusatrum, S. perfoliatum
  • Family Name: Umbelliferae/Apiaceae
No known hazards with this plant and would be fine as part of a varied diet for the tortoise enclosure.

One way to identify Alexanders is that a crushed or broken leaf or stem smells like celery.
Thankyou :)
 

New Posts

Top