Tropical Hibiscus for New enclosure?

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theguy67

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Its been a LONG time since I have posted here, but hoping to change that. I am working fast to finish my tortoise enclosure before spring arrives. The enclosure is 30ft long, by 30ft wide in the shape of an "L" ( so there is a notch taken out of it where it wraps around the green house.)

I was at Walmart the other day hunting for plants. The only suitable shrub they had this early was some tropical hibiscus. Seeing their size and low price I grabbed 3 not thinking. I want these to be planted in the ground, but I also want them to last a few years. The plant's name ( or what was on the tag) is rosa-sinensis. I did some research and said it is winter hardy in zone 9 and the southern zones. I live in Texas, and am in zone 8. I do have a back wall of the green house that faces the south to witch they could be planted?( although I was aiming for a different location).

Anyone else have experience with these or other tropical hibiscus? I was thinking about either wrapping them, or digging them up to move inside for winter until the next spring. I am not sure how effective either one of these ideas would be. Next time I am certainly going to aim for hardy hibiscus.

thanks!
 

Yvonne G

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The hardy hibiscus do very well here in Central California, where we have night time winter temps in the low 30'sF. But the tropical hibiscus will totally die and not come back.

The hardy dies back in the winter, but comes up again in the spring from the roots.

I have two planted in the ground outside, and one in a pot that I brought into the greenhouse this winter. The one in the pot also died back.
 

theguy67

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I do have some native texas star hibiscus ( hardy) that I can collect and plant, but what do you think about the 3 tropical plants I already have? Would digging them up every fall be an option? I read they go semi-dormant ( compared to hardy, which go compoletely dormant) but they still require some water and a little light.
 

Millerlite

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You might be able to prune them around winter time. Or just plant them in pots bring them inside when needed. Or greenhouse
 
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