Bladder stone

William Lee Kohler

Well-Known Member
5 Year Member
Location (City and/or State)
Eugene, OR
I use this pro terra bark, and i know that this substrate has a TON of rocks in it so he deffinatly has accses to small rocks.

You can also get rid of the rocks by putting it all in several inches of water. Stir it around so the rocks fall onto the bottom and just fish out the floating bedding with your hands. Save the money instead of throwing it out.
 

yay14

Active Member
Location (City and/or State)
stockholm
All the stones you have found look more consistent with pea gravel and NOT bladder stones. Go out side with safety glasses on and hit the stone with a hammer- it will shatter since it is way higher on the Mohs Mineral hardness scale than a bladder could ever be.
Thanks for helping me, but i had one more question, When i found the stone in the water bowl it was laying on a bed of sort of something similar to sand accept it was not clumpy in the water, do you have any idea what that was?
 

Blackdog1714

Well-Known Member
Today is my birthday!
Location (City and/or State)
Richmond, VA
Thanks for helping me, but i had one more question, When i found the stone in the water bowl it was laying on a bed of sort of something similar to sand accept it was not clumpy in the water, do you have any idea what that was?
It could be the silt that coats most pea gravel unless you wash it repeatedly before use. Often softer stones even pumice find there way into this gravel mix. Making gravel is a very dirty and sticky work that is fairly precise so extra bits are normal
 

yay14

Active Member
Location (City and/or State)
stockholm
It could be the silt that coats most pea gravel unless you wash it repeatedly before use. Often softer stones even pumice find there way into this gravel mix. Making gravel is a very dirty and sticky work that is fairly precise so extra bits are normal
I am pretty sure it was silt :)
 
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