How to get rid of pond floating algae ?

enchilada

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How to deal with pond floating algae?
It appears every day once the temperature rises .
Right now I have a canister filter with UV . I tried to scoop out as much as I can and changed 70% of water .... no effect at all :(
6BA97078-F1D7-461C-B3FE-9E72D693FC18.jpeg
 

mark1

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my opinion would be more filtration , mechanical and biological , clean the substrate , more uv , more plants , especially those that just root in the water and grow out of the water ........ the space between the pond and the wall appears like a perfect spot for a waterfall which can be designed to be a pretty good filter in itself .........
 

orv

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Adding a few koi or other algae eating fish along with aeration, either by water-fall or perhaps a fountain will keep algae under control. Unless you're trying to breed water turtles, the koi won't be a threat. In fact, turtles will help keep the koi population in check. Algae was a significant problem in our six ponds up until a few years ago when we added moving water to the picture. Aeration of the system, along with a few fish should be a good answer for you.
 

Markw84

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@enchilada Shade. Then try more shade. Then try even more shade!

Everything @orv lists is vital. But once you have ensured there is not too much fish/turtle load for the filtration system, and have proper water movement and aeration, if the pond is in full sunlight, you can rarely get away from algae problems.

It takes a pond a full two years to get established. The biofilm that develops on everything from the lining to the plumbing, to plant roots, etc. just takes time to fully develop. Changing water can actually slow this process. In every pond I have built, there is a huge different in the 3rd year. But a pond in full sun, just is not going to be as trouble free as if you provide shade over at least 50%. The first few years, you will definitely have big problems.

I find you will also see a real spike in algae activity once the sun reaches about 60° in elevation mid-day. For me that is about mid April. With the higher sun, more of the longer wavelengths of light pass easily into water instead of reflected. (An Algae bloom loves red light. That is the longest visible wavelength.)

So shade is your friend in designing a pond. Plant trees around the pond that are "pond friendly". Until they grow, put up shade sails. When a pond is newer, I like to see at least 66% in shade most of the day.

Also, A UV filter will help tremendously with green water algae, as it must be free floating in the water to pass through the filter. But it will have no effect, in fact it will enhance string algae growth as it is removing competing algae.

Good, vigorous aeration is also most overlooked by most people with ponds. A good pond grade aerator that really mixes the water and puts a nice wide column of bubble in the pond really cannot be beat for almost doubling the oxygen content to the water - and reducing algae. It is also unbeatable for fish health.
 

orv

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We had significant algae problems with our ponds, even resorting to chemical algaecides, much to the determint of our precious wildlife. Five years ago, we linked our six ponds with pumps, running the water over a stone riverbed. Our resort covers 145 acres and the ponds are connected throughout. Unfortunately, only one of the ponds has significant tree cover, the rest are in full sun. However, since linking the ponds with running streams, there has been no further floating algae. Pond life flurishes without the use of chemicals and all is well. We have a good balance of fish, turtles and bird life.
 

orv

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thank you so much .
what are good aeration methods? ( shade sails and big trees are pretty expensive.)
Pumps may be found at pond and pool supply houses. Let them assist you with the proper size pump for your situation. You might find that a small waterfall would fit your needs pluss adding some beauty along with the soothing sound of flowinf H2O. Good luck in beautifying your pond. Several of ours have shaded mediation areas around them and one has a picnic area. Unfortunatelly, the picnic area attracts the blankedly, blank ducks when picnicers leave scraps. . . on purpose or not. Fish and pelletized turtle foods are available at our resort office. I just have to keep them supplied. I purchase the food through Amazin a nd provide it at cost. It's not really much.
 

mark1

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water hyacynthe will give anything I seen a run for it's money , even duckweed , does a great job cleaning water of ammonia , nitrates and toxins , I've seen it live through northeast ohio winters , i'd imagine it'd live through yours ... i'm told water lettuce is good , but for some reason it doesn't do well for me ....... as far as oxygenating , go with a waterfall with the water falling/flowing in a thin film over and through rocks , gravel and biomedia , shade the waterfall , with turtles i'd think you'd want full sun on the pond , at least if you lived in a climate like mine you would ........... when the water cools off into the 60's the nitrifying bacteria , at least the kind your depending on , will become less efficient ..... long term you need to make sure there are not places where waste can accumulate in the sediment , make sure there is water movement through the sediment , or you have to physically clean it on occasion ............
 

Markw84

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thank you so much .
what are good aeration methods? ( shade sails and big trees are pretty expensive.)
There is nothing that comes close to a good aerator built for ponds as far as increasing oxygen content in the water. I have big waterfalls and use that for aeration, with my whole pond volume equivalent going over the falls every 90 minutes. However, adding a good aerator with two aeration plates made an unbelievable difference. I had not used them for years, and couldn't believe the difference as soon as I installed a good one. All the tiny bubbles, combined with the circulation created by the bubbles rising, totally changes the pond environment. So it not only adding tremendous water/air surface area with all the bubbles, but it causes a circulation in the pond where bottom water is constantly being circulated to the top and mixing. Waterfalls are great and important, but cannot create this type of circulation. I think the one I use was about $350, but has a nice size compressor and two large diffuser plates. My pond is about 10,000 gal. You would not need one that big and probably just one diffuser plate system.

Aerator.jpg

Shade sails are not that expensive. You do have to have a secure way to mount them as they are also good wind sails!! But you will really find a huge difference if you find some way to shade your pond. Search by size and color. Depending upon popularity the same sail in a different color is the difference between $85 and $20!

Shade Sail.jpg
 

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