Injections

Marti Reece

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Apr 13, 2015
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So, I took Huck to the vet this past week because he was wheezing. After a xray and exam she determined he has the equivalent to a sinus infection and has to be on antibiotics . He is a 7 year old sulcata and VERY STRONG. She told me to give his injection in the back leg but this is seriously impossible. Does anyone have any advice on how to give an injection to a very strong tort?
 

Jodie

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I have always been told NOT to give injections in back legs, but to do it in front legs. Is your vet a reptile vet with tortoise experience.? I am alarmed by the information you have been given. My understanding is back leg injections can cause serious problems and damage. Wait for others to chime in before doing that, but I am pretty sure. I have given antibiotics to a 20 pound leopard and a yearling Leopard. Both times in front legs. Sliding the needle between the scales is easy in the front.
 
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Maggie Cummings

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Yep, I also have been told the same as Jodie. However, I do it in the soft skin between leg and neck. A strawberry given at the same time is the trick, then it's just an easy skin pop. Unless it's IM. Then it's the leg. But sub q is real easy how I do it...
 

mike taylor

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My vet had me go into the front legs . Something about the meds moving to fast by going into back legs.
 
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Maggie Cummings

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So give him some strawberries and when he's eating and not paying attention, quickly slip the needle under a scale in the FRONT leg. It will probably take more than one try, but be patient and keep trying, you need to distract him with a favorite treat. You can do it...
 

Lyn W

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There was a thread here a while back about one poor little tort that lost the use of his back legs after an injection in them, so I would seek the advice of a specialist tortoise vet before doing anything.
 

Yvonne G

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If you're giving the tortoise Baytril, that is an injectible and an oral medication, so you can inject it into a piece of food then feed it orally.
 

Marti Reece

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Yes it was a exotic pet specialist and she sees lots of sulcatas but I was worried after reading everything about shots in the back legs. I have not given him a shot yet there because of it. I will try the treat idea and the front leg. Thank you so much for all the advice. The thing I like about front leg is that if he pulls in to his shell it is still exposed!
 
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Maggie Cummings

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Yes it was a exotic pet specialist and she sees lots of sulcatas but I was worried after reading everything about shots in the back legs. I have not given him a shot yet there because of it. I will try the treat idea and the front leg. Thank you so much for all the advice. The thing I like about front leg is that if he pulls in to his shell it is still exposed!

Good luck with it, and keep us posted. Is it Baytril? Yvonne says you can inject Baytril into a treat and he can eat it. She's my sister, and when she talks turtles I believe what she says....
 

Randi

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I would agree that it should not be injected in the back legs. There are too many things that can be damaged with using the back legs. There is a big risk for paralysis. Front legs would be best. As mentioned, if it's Baytril, you can inject it into a food item and feed. Best of luck to you and yours.
 

Marti Reece

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Ok so get this the injections don't say what they are....calling the vet. Injecting a tomato would b so much easier!!
 

Randi

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Oh boy.. that's not good. All prescriptions should be labelled properly or are liable to be misused. All dosages and instructions should be on a prescription label as well. I would never accept medication/prescriptions without a label. Always look at these things before you leave - I have my vet check the label. I recently had an issue with a prescription - my dog had surgery on his eye and needed ointment. The label said three days so we stopped after three days. The vet called to see how he is and I told her his eye is red after the three days of ointment. We are supposed to be using it for two weeks apparently. Someone screwed up on the label. Always make it a habit to look and have it checked by the vet. Best of luck to you and yours.
 
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