Should I get a Great Dane?

AnnV

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My sister in law has owned Bernese Mtn Dogs all her adult life. I dont think any have lived past 7 or 8, and some much less. She loves them and keeps buying them, always having at least two. I guess she just accepts the short life span.
Lyme and some of the other tick bite diseases are killing our dogs off in a most terrible way. Thirteen years ago we moved to our beautiful farm in CT, with picturesque stone walls all around the 31 acres. But i have found thay these walls house the mice and chipmunk vectors for these diseases. In particular, I have been dealing with the coinfections of Lyme and Anaplasma. The coinfections are particularly dangerous, hardly giving an animal's immune system a chance. I have had such health issues with my dogs after being infected (nearly 100% Lyme infected and 50% coinfected), even after treatment.
I now belong to a tick discussion group and realize most vets undertreat. Or miss the diagnosis all together, as happened with my heart dog. Its been 4 years since I lost her, and I swear I may never recoup.
Chronic infections develop and end the dogs' lives prematurely through a variety of mechanisms. I have spent enough on vet bills in the last few years to buy a herd of Radiated torts!!! And lost beloved dogs in heartbreaking ways, regardless. I will be glad to leave this TBD epicenter and move to FL.
 

Leopard Tortoise Lover 16199

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AnnV said:
My sister in law has owned Bernese Mtn Dogs all her adult life. I dont think any have lived past 7 or 8, and some much less. She loves them and keeps buying them, always having at least two. I guess she just accepts the short life span.
Lyme and some of the other tick bite diseases are killing our dogs off in a most terrible way. Thirteen years ago we moved to our beautiful farm in CT, with picturesque stone walls all around the 31 acres. But i have found thay these walls house the mice and chipmunk vectors for these diseases. In particular, I have been dealing with the coinfections of Lyme and Anaplasma. The coinfections are particularly dangerous, hardly giving an animal's immune system a chance. I have had such health issues with my dogs after being infected (nearly 100% Lyme infected and 50% coinfected), even after treatment.
I now belong to a tick discussion group and realize most vets undertreat. Or miss the diagnosis all together, as happened with my heart dog. Its been 4 years since I lost her, and I swear I may never recoup.
Chronic infections develop and end the dogs' lives prematurely through a variety of mechanisms. I have spent enough on vet bills in the last few years to buy a herd of Radiated torts!!! And lost beloved dogs in heartbreaking ways, regardless. I will be glad to leave this TBD epicenter and move to FL.

That's very sad about your dogs that got Lyme disease. I agree; it's terrible, but it's all around us. We have woods in the back of our house, of which a neighbor's son contracted Lyme disease from. Its a great place for deer ticks (though we never seem to get any fleas.) My own dog had been acting less active for months, with his knee cap popping out more frequently (he had luxating patella.) We thought this was the cause. But then, we noticed he wasn't eating much and was drinking lots of water. His breath had a terrible smell. We rushed him to the vet, who delivered the bad news that he had severe kidney problems. He tested negative for chemical poisoning and a variety of other tests. The only diagnosis that would fit was Lyme disease gone undetected. He had to be on fluids for three days, then underwent a blood transfusion, and passed away the next evening. It was terrible. :(
I think it's great your getting involved with the tick discussion group. Keep educating people and hopefully many will see that this is a serious problem!! There is a Lyme vaccination I just found out about, and I would encourage everyone to vaccinate their dogs against this ruthless disease. My next dog will surely get the vaccination.
Again, the consequences are so tragic. It's extremely tough to lose a pet so early, and I'm so sorry for anyone who had to experience this firsthand. So lets do everything in our power to prevent this! Everyone, please get your pets vaccinated against Lyme disease - when you least expect it, your dog could fall into the grave consequences of this terrible disease.
 

sibi

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I tell you, my heart breaks for those who have lost their dogs. I have a 33 year old son who loves hiking. A couple of years ago, he went hiking with a group of his friends in Virginia. He and another friend contacted Lyme disease. His friend sort medical help with extreme fatigue. My son, on the other hand, didn't because he always thought it was too much exercise (he works out in a gym), or it must be the start of a flu. There was always some other explanation. So he wasn't diagnosed until it was late stage of Lyme disease. He went to specialists after specialists. Finally, he was referred to someone in the D.C. area. He found out that in addition to Lyme disease, he got a secondary disease that was even worse than the Lyme. He's been on several antibiotics and will need to remain on them for 8-9 months! Even then, we don't know how this will effect his cognitive abilities, or joints down the road. People, every living thing needs to beware of ticks in wooded areas!
 

peasinapod

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AW: Should I get a Great Dane?

We live in a very tick-infested area, woods all around us! I remember my mum always checking us for ticks if we had been playing outside near the woods and fields.

A friend got meningitis due to ticks. The worst part was that the first doctor didn't diagnose it. (when a friend had a sepsis on her arm, he told her to come back once the arm turned black...??)
 

Leopard Tortoise Lover 16199

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sibi said:
I tell you, my heart breaks for those who have lost their dogs. I have a 33 year old son who loves hiking. A couple of years ago, he went hiking with a group of his friends in Virginia. He and another friend contacted Lyme disease. His friend sort medical help with extreme fatigue. My son, on the other hand, didn't because he always thought it was too much exercise (he works out in a gym), or it must be the start of a flu. There was always some other explanation. So he wasn't diagnosed until it was late stage of Lyme disease. He went to specialists after specialists. Finally, he was referred to someone in the D.C. area. He found out that in addition to Lyme disease, he got a secondary disease that was even worse than the Lyme. He's been on several antibiotics and will need to remain on them for 8-9 months! Even then, we don't know how this will effect his cognitive abilities, or joints down the road. People, every living thing needs to beware of ticks in wooded areas!

Wow. I'm sorry to hear that about your son. Ticks are TERRIBLE!!
I know someone else that got Lyme disease and now is very sick for long periods of time and has severe muscle and bone pains. And like you said, sometimes the secondary diseases contracted from the tick may be just as bad or even worse. :(


peasinapod said:
We live in a very tick-infested area, woods all around us! I remember my mum always checking us for ticks if we had been playing outside near the woods and fields.

A friend got meningitis due to ticks. The worst part was that the first doctor didn't diagnose it. (when a friend had a sepsis on her arm, he told her to come back once the arm turned black...??)

What?!! The doctor should have treated the arm for infection/prevention of whatever he knew would happen. Once your arm turns black, that means a severe infection, possibly life-threatening. :(
 

peasinapod

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Leopard Tortoise Lover 16199 said:
What?!! The doctor should have treated the arm for infection/prevention of whatever he knew would happen. Once your arm turns black, that means a severe infection, possibly life-threatening. :(

I know! Luckily they went to another doctor for a second opinion.


Onto the original topic of Great Danes: I think they are very cool dogs but they tend to slobber too much for me. Furthermore their short lifespan just makes me sad thinking about it. But I guess I was spoiled, we had a dwarf poodle in my family who lived with us for a bit more than 18 years.
 

Team Gomberg

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For the record, neither of my Danes slobered.
I did have them drink water from an elevated water dish on an outside covered patio though. Once they drank, I cleaned up their jowels or let them drip dry before coming back in.
But no drool. :)
 

Team Gomberg

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Re: RE: Should I get a Great Dane?

Leopard Tortoise Lover 16199 said:
I guess it depends on the dog. Some dogs drool more than others, and some don't drool at all.

Yes. And I was sooooooo glad I didn't have the drool monsters!
 

mike taylor

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I'm not going to lie ! But the best dog i have ever owned is my Boston Terrier meaty! One of the smartest dogs I have owned . You can just see what he is thinking on his little flat face . If I drank beer I think he would know when I needed a refill and get me a can. But most Bostons are hyper and don't really learn fast but I think I got lucky with meaty. He rides with us everywhere hunting,fishing,and taking the kids to school. I have an English bulldog to. But that dude is just for cleaning up food . Ha ha
 

Tom

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I haven't had time to comment on this tread, but I keep meaning to. Danes are a fantastic breed. At work everyone talks to me about their dogs since I'm the "animal guy". I frequently get asked what breed someone should get. With the disclaimer that any breed can work with enough time, money and effort, I have found two breeds that usually turn out to be good pets with a minimum of time effort and training ability. More so than most other breeds, in my experience. The standard poodle, and the Great Dane. I have raised and trained 6 Danes from pups, and worked with several dozen others. I LOVE the breed.

Like any mastiff type, they can be dog aggressive. And yes they are big, but they don't eat or poop anymore than any other large dog, like a german shepard. They actually do well in apartments as long as they get an adequate daily walk or two. They really just settle in and become really good dogs for most people.

About the life span: One of mine died inexplicably at three years old. No apparent reason. The vet said that sometimes the heart valves just blow out on some of the giant breeds. The breeder had heard of this and swears this does not exist in her lines. All of the other ones have lived to 11 or 12, except one. Remember the Mel Gibson movie called "The Patriot"? The mantled Dane in that one was named Jake. He lived one month shy of 15. 14years and 11 months. My current Dane is going strong at almost 9 years old right now. I am well aware that most people say Danes have a short life span, but I have found them to be no different than any other breed. My breeder says her are averaging 12-13 years, and she's had her lines going for more than 30 years now. My first Malinois is steadily declining at 12 years old, but his littermate brother died from cancer at 8.

Of all the dozens of Danes I have worked with, only one was a drooler. He is the one who died early for no apparent reason. He and his brother did the movie "Seven Pounds" with Will Smith and Rosario Dawson. We couldn't use the drooler in the car scenes...

Hip dysplasia: This is not typically a problem with Danes. Another over-exaggeration or myth. I have a book on HD and it lists Danes as number 23 on the list of breeds most pre-disposed to HD.

Behaviorally, they can be stand-offish with strangers, but seldom are they aggressive or bitey. Proper puppy socialization can eliminate this. For the first year and a half or so, they tend to be a bit buck wild, but most of them settle down after that initial "wild" phase. They all like to sit with their butt on the couch, their front feet on the floor, and watch TV with their families. I haven't found any differences between males and females are far as activity level or aggression.

Anyhow, I'm a huge fan of the breed. They are my favorite "pet" breed. I really like the mantles, but my first two were fawns. I have worked with all the colors and I like all of them. If you already like the breed as much as your first post reveals, I think you will be very happy with one.
 

Leopard Tortoise Lover 16199

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Tom said:
I haven't had time to comment on this tread, but I keep meaning to. Danes are a fantastic breed. At work everyone talks to me about their dogs since I'm the "animal guy". I frequently get asked what breed someone should get. With the disclaimer that any breed can work with enough time, money and effort, I have found two breeds that usually turn out to be good pets with a minimum of time effort and training ability. More so than most other breeds, in my experience. The standard poodle, and the Great Dane. I have raised and trained 6 Danes from pups, and worked with several dozen others. I LOVE the breed.

Like any mastiff type, they can be dog aggressive. And yes they are big, but they don't eat or poop anymore than any other large dog, like a german shepard. They actually do well in apartments as long as they get an adequate daily walk or two. They really just settle in and become really good dogs for most people.

About the life span: One of mine died inexplicably at three years old. No apparent reason. The vet said that sometimes the heart valves just blow out on some of the giant breeds. The breeder had heard of this and swears this does not exist in her lines. All of the other ones have lived to 11 or 12, except one. Remember the Mel Gibson movie called "The Patriot"? The mantled Dane in that one was named Jake. He lived one month shy of 15. 14years and 11 months. My current Dane is going strong at almost 9 years old right now. I am well aware that most people say Danes have a short life span, but I have found them to be no different than any other breed. My breeder says her are averaging 12-13 years, and she's had her lines going for more than 30 years now. My first Malinois is steadily declining at 12 years old, but his littermate brother died from cancer at 8.

Of all the dozens of Danes I have worked with, only one was a drooler. He is the one who died early for no apparent reason. He and his brother did the movie "Seven Pounds" with Will Smith and Rosario Dawson. We couldn't use the drooler in the car scenes...

Hip dysplasia: This is not typically a problem with Danes. Another over-exaggeration or myth. I have a book on HD and it lists Danes as number 23 on the list of breeds most pre-disposed to HD.

Behaviorally, they can be stand-offish with strangers, but seldom are they aggressive or bitey. Proper puppy socialization can eliminate this. For the first year and a half or so, they tend to be a bit buck wild, but most of them settle down after that initial "wild" phase. They all like to sit with their butt on the couch, their front feet on the floor, and watch TV with their families. I haven't found any differences between males and females are far as activity level or aggression.

Anyhow, I'm a huge fan of the breed. They are my favorite "pet" breed. I really like the mantles, but my first two were fawns. I have worked with all the colors and I like all of them. If you already like the breed as much as your first post reveals, I think you will be very happy with one.

Wow, Tom! Thanks for the input. It's amazing that one of your danes lived almost 15 years. That's outstanding!!
It's sad to hear that one lived only 3 years. :( And that's a real problem with all the giant breeds - heart problems, as well as the bone and joint issues as they get older. And it's good to know that fact about hip dysplasia. You would think it would be another big problem with them since they're such a large breed.
So the dogs are like actors? That's really amazing. I never knew you did movies with the dogs.
I agree that they're a great breed. I still have to do some research, but I hope I'll be getting my puppy soon! :)
 

Tom

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There is only one breeder I'd get one from. She breeds for temperament, structure and working ability. Her dogs win in the show circuit, but I don't care anything about that. What I care about is how well they work, and hers work VERY well. PM me if you want her number.
 

Leopard Tortoise Lover 16199

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Thanks everyone for the advice! :)
(Tom, where is the breeder from? I'm in Indiana).

What is a good, fair price for a female fawn puppy with AKC full registration
 

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Re: RE: Should I get a Great Dane?

Leopard Tortoise Lover 16199 said:
What is a good, fair price for a female fawn puppy with AKC full registration

Just a heads up, Most good breeders won't sell with full registration (breeding rights) unless they know you will show. And even then, sometimes they have c/o ownership until you finish the dog.
Not sure if that is the direction you wanted to go.
$2-3k is what I've seen from good breeders.
 

Leopard Tortoise Lover 16199

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Team Gomberg said:
Leopard Tortoise Lover 16199 said:
What is a good, fair price for a female fawn puppy with AKC full registration

Just a heads up, Most good breeders won't sell with full registration (breeding rights) unless they know you will show. And even then, sometimes they have c/o ownership until you finish the dog.
Not sure if that is the direction you wanted to go.
$2-3k is what I've seen from good breeders.

I have never showed a dog before. However, I've been visiting AKC shows in my area lately and decided I might like to participate. I would need to go to a class, which my local all breed club offers classes of different levels. I saw some brindle Danes at a show a few weeks ago, a male and a female. The owners of the female were also beginners. I also got the privilege of sitting up front with the judges, and I now have an idea of what goes on at the show. I still have a lot of learning to do, but I think it would be a good experience. What are your opinions on this?
I also discovered a small family breeder in my area, who is offering 1/4 Euro champion bloodline puppies from fawn-brindle breeding for $1,000 limited registration and $1,200 for full. 1 year health guar, UTD on vacc., vet examined, and puppy care package come with. I think it is a good deal but what is your opinion? It is 2 hours away from me. I am interested in a fawn female (pics below).
ImageUploadedByTortForum1384389414157811 ImageUploadedByTortForum1384389426132201


And she was Brin September 28, 2013.


I think she is a beautiful looking Dane puppy, what are your opinions.
 
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Team Gomberg

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If you want to look into showing, that's great. That was never what I wanted with Danes but in your case of wanting full registration, interest in showing offers much more availability for you.
You could possibly find a breeder who could mentor you in the ring as well.

The pup you showed, are they selling her with full registration to whomever will pay the higher amount? If so, it would concern me. A breeder who protects their lines and reputation would want to know that reputation will be upheld by the pups they sell. That's usually why they are strict (limited registration or Co ownership) when selling pups.


1/4 euro champion..

If you want to show, I think it would be wise to purchase a Dane from a litter where the dam and sire are both finished. That breeder would also have an advantage of assessing the pup for potential.

Do you know if this pup's parents were both health tested?
 

Leopard Tortoise Lover 16199

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Yes, they were tested for cardio, hips, eye exam, and I believe thyroid also. Even if I decide not to show for conformation, I would like to compete in agility or obedience.


And for full reg. it is a solid $1200, and for limited $1000. It's not who pays the higher amount, but who picks the puppy first
 

Kim444

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My friend has 2 rescue Danes and both are over 10 now. She feeds them a prey model raw diet and it really makes a difference in the life span of her dogs. She also has a yellow lab who is also over 10.
 
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