need CREATIVE tortoise table ideas

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Avocado034

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I have two juvenile redfoot tortoises, approximately 4 years old each. Maybe 6 inches long. I want to build them a indoor enclosure that will last the next few years. But, I have a few requirements. I am a single female and don't want a super-cumbersome heavy, awkward, wood tortoise table. Ideally, I need something that is....

- lightweight

- can be taken apart (live in an upstairs apartment, and will move eventually, not final residence)

- removeable bottom?? (something easy to clean, so I don't have to take whole cage outside/apart to clean

I know sides have to be dark (not wire/glass) so that limits the materials, but does anyone have any ideas? Also, they have a good outdoor enclosure, and I need to limit the indoor to about 2 or 3 ft wide to about 6 feet long. I know not ideal, but they get outside, and that is my space requirement.

I know plans online, but super cumbersome, heavy, and I don't have room to construct. Will have to construct outside, get up flight of stairs, fit through the door, and in my smallish space avaliable for them.

Creative ideas a must!!

Thanks in advance.
 

Tom

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That is a very tall order. Don't know how to balance all those factors. You might just have to make it heavy and get some help carrying it. That's what I do and I'm a big strong man. (Well in my own mind I am...)

I'd also suggest a closed chamber over an open tortoise table. It is very difficult to maintain good redfoot conditions in an open topped enclosure indoors.
 

jaizei

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I believe I've seen someone take 2 of the Christmas tree totes, cut one end off each one and 'weld' them together. I would also built a wood frame for support (tote sides seem to bulge), and maybe have some sort of plastic underneath in case of leaks.

I'll look for a link, but I'm not sure if it was on this forum or not.
 

Madkins007

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(Why would the sides need to be dark?)

Easy-peasy. Make it out of PVC pipe and sheet plastics (and a little plywood)

First, an optional base with casters. Any on-line plans for a PVC table will show you how to do this. (Note- in order to support the rest of the weight, consider making it with 6 legs and some crossbars on top). This section is optional because the whole thing can just as easily rest on the floor.

Then, a PVC frame for the 'bathtub'- make a PVC box the size of the base and about 12-18" high. Fasten some strong plywood to the bottom (in a way that lets you remove it later. NOTE- if you build this on the floor, you can substitute the wood for rigid foam insulation boards to insulate it from the floor.), and corrugated plastic (available from signmakers, cut to size) for the sides. Line the whole shebang with a single blue tarp or other big piece of plastic, folding it in the corners and securing it to the PVC.

As you design the bathtub- leave the corner posts open on top for the next stage...

Then make a simple lightweight box frame, using the corners of the tub to rest the uprights in. Make this section strong enough to hang lights from, but not super strong. Cover with clear plastic or vinyl as a tent. Use tape and Velcro to make some access flaps for cleaning and feeding.

You may not have the 'mad skillz' to make this, but I bet you have a friend or family member that you can show the idea to, who will have the plans drawn up in an hour, and be excited to help you make it just because it would be such a cool project.

You can add so many cool aspects to this- mounting a small area heater and humidifier inside off the upper section, etc. You can make clips to hold the plastic by taking some PVC the next size bigger and cutting it into 2-4" segments, then cutting out just under half of the cylinder side so you have a 2-4" long letter C. It should snap over the tubing of the frame to hold the plastic in place. So many other cool possibilities!

I'd also build it in the three sections I mentioned so each can be easily moved. You might even think about not gluing some of the key joints and using small screws instead so it can be disassembled into an even smaller pile.
 

Dagashi

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Madkins007 said:
(Why would the sides need to be dark?)

Easy-peasy. Make it out of PVC pipe and sheet plastics (and a little plywood)

First, an optional base with casters. Any on-line plans for a PVC table will show you how to do this. (Note- in order to support the rest of the weight, consider making it with 6 legs and some crossbars on top). This section is optional because the whole thing can just as easily rest on the floor.

Then, a PVC frame for the 'bathtub'- make a PVC box the size of the base and about 12-18" high. Fasten some strong plywood to the bottom (in a way that lets you remove it later. NOTE- if you build this on the floor, you can substitute the wood for rigid foam insulation boards to insulate it from the floor.), and corrugated plastic (available from signmakers, cut to size) for the sides. Line the whole shebang with a single blue tarp or other big piece of plastic, folding it in the corners and securing it to the PVC.

As you design the bathtub- leave the corner posts open on top for the next stage...

Then make a simple lightweight box frame, using the corners of the tub to rest the uprights in. Make this section strong enough to hang lights from, but not super strong. Cover with clear plastic or vinyl as a tent. Use tape and Velcro to make some access flaps for cleaning and feeding.

You may not have the 'mad skillz' to make this, but I bet you have a friend or family member that you can show the idea to, who will have the plans drawn up in an hour, and be excited to help you make it just because it would be such a cool project.

You can add so many cool aspects to this- mounting a small area heater and humidifier inside off the upper section, etc. You can make clips to hold the plastic by taking some PVC the next size bigger and cutting it into 2-4" segments, then cutting out just under half of the cylinder side so you have a 2-4" long letter C. It should snap over the tubing of the frame to hold the plastic in place. So many other cool possibilities!

I'd also build it in the three sections I mentioned so each can be easily moved. You might even think about not gluing some of the key joints and using small screws instead so it can be disassembled into an even smaller pile.

That's really creative!
 

Avocado034

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Would the sheet plastic make it too hot in the enclosure? (reflecting lights/heat emitter??)
 

Madkins007

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The tent should help conserve heat and humidity. Since it won't be air tight, it should also still allow fresh air.

As far as trapping TOO MUCH heat, that is a really good reason to use controls, like a thermostat on the heat emitter or dimmers on the lights.
 
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