Pine Bark Mulch vs Cypress Mulch for RF's ?

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paver1960

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Best thing is a dirt substrate for these guys. Coconut coir fiber with some sand works well or topsoil, sand and peat. If it's sandy enough, it won't stick to them and yet the mix will still hold moisture.

I'm not a fan of any mulch. Too dangerous in my experience for these guys as they'll eat anything.

Craig
 

Geochelone_Carbonaria

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mel262011 said:
use cypress, they sell it at home depot for about $2.50 for 2cuFT (56L).

Excellent, please tell me where the nearest "Home Depot" is in Sweden then ? :D

paver1960 said:
Best thing is a dirt substrate for these guys. Coconut coir fiber with some sand works well or topsoil, sand and peat. If it's sandy enough, it won't stick to them and yet the mix will still hold moisture.

I'm not a fan of any mulch. Too dangerous in my experience for these guys as they'll eat anything.

Craig

No further comment needed, apart from that you should read the post again...
 

Madkins007

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paver1960 said:
Best thing is a dirt substrate for these guys. Coconut coir fiber with some sand works well or topsoil, sand and peat. If it's sandy enough, it won't stick to them and yet the mix will still hold moisture.

I'm not a fan of any mulch. Too dangerous in my experience for these guys as they'll eat anything.

Craig

I am a firm believer in the bioactive substrate- a mix of soils, mulches, and sand- that has been activated with micro-organisms that help digest food wastes and fecal matter (but does not do it completely), especially when you add isopods and worms to the mix. (http://www.tortoiselibrary.com/substrates.html )

The problem is that this is a 'heavy' mix, and not suitable for all indoor habitats.

Odor-less hardwood mulches, on the other hand, tend to be cheap, low-maintenance, light-weight, and effective for many species. I've raised several Red-foots on them now in the winter for several years and had no problems with ingestion.

However, as we have mentioned many, many times before- everyone's needs, experiences, and situation are different.
 
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