Helpful Russian?

Status
Not open for further replies.

MikeCow1

Member
5 Year Member
Joined
Mar 31, 2012
Messages
367
Location (City and/or State)
Orange County, CA
Weirdest thing yesterday. One of my female Russians had flipped on her back and couldn't flip herself back over. As I was walking over to flip her I saw the male headed her way. I thought he was going to bite at her, as he often does. Instead he went under her on the side and flipped her back over. So very strange
 

lynnedit

Well-Known Member
10 Year Member!
Joined
Feb 25, 2011
Messages
5,730
Location (City and/or State)
Southwest Washington
There was a video of a tortoise doing that to another tort that was posted for awhile.
Still, it's amazing; I guess he has to keep his potential mates around!
 

alben909

New Member
5 Year Member
Joined
Mar 12, 2012
Messages
313
Location (City and/or State)
Yuciapa,CA
I have a feeling the male has something to do with her getting on her back in the first place :D. He probably felt guilty., that's why he flopped her back over. :cool:
 

wellington

Well-Known Member
Moderator
10 Year Member!
Tortoise Club
Joined
Sep 6, 2011
Messages
44,322
Location (City and/or State)
Chicago, Illinois, USA
I just really wonder. Is it really always bullying. I mean, in the wild, there are no humans to tip them back over. If they can tip over so easily, there would be hundreds if not thousands dying daily in the wild. We do everything to make sure it can't happen, well the wild is not flat and smooth or blocked off like our enclosures. It is possible, isn't it, that even though some might get tipped over by a tort, that same tort might right him also as a species survival thing? I just don't by the fact it is always bullying. If it was, why not walk away, you won, he can't flip himself, he will die, you won. Just something to think about.
 

TortoiseBoy1999

Active Member
5 Year Member
Joined
Jun 15, 2012
Messages
2,369
Location (City and/or State)
Palmdale CA
wellington said:
I just really wonder. Is it really always bullying. I mean, in the wild, there are no humans to tip them back over. If they can tip over so easily, there would be hundreds if not thousands dying daily in the wild. We do everything to make sure it can't happen, well the wild is not flat and smooth or blocked off like our enclosures. It is possible, isn't it, that even though some might get tipped over by a tort, that same tort might right him also as a species survival thing? I just don't by the fact it is always bullying. If it was, why not walk away, you won, he can't flip himself, he will die, you won. Just something to think about.

Wow.....GOOD POINT!!!! Never thought of that!
 

MikeCow1

Member
5 Year Member
Joined
Mar 31, 2012
Messages
367
Location (City and/or State)
Orange County, CA
alben909 said:
I have a feeling the male has something to do with her getting on her back in the first place :D. He probably felt guilty., that's why he flopped her back over. :cool:

No, it was her trying to climb up and out. Was watching when it happened. I always give them a few minutes to tip themselves back if they can
 

GBtortoises

Well-Known Member
10 Year Member!
Joined
Feb 27, 2009
Messages
3,627
Location (City and/or State)
The Catskill Mountains of New York State
More than likely what actually took place is that the male was attracted to the movement (flailing around) of the other tortoise as a sign of aggression and went to chase an intruder away. The fact that he righted the over turned female in the process was "happenstance". It's extremely doubtful that tortoises and turtles have the mental ability to make a conscientious decision to save another tortoise. Especially by flipping it back over. If tortoises and turtles could warn each other of danger or save each other from harm then there should be far fewer ones run over on roads, falling off of things or getting otherwise getting caught or injured.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top