Shell flaking

Swank1987

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I have adopted a male Sulcata. His owner said the deformity was normal shell growth, but I have my concerns. It’s not soft and doesn’t appear to be shell rot IMO. It appears to be dehydration. I’m really looking for ways to improve his shell health.
 

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wellington

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It's not normal shell growth. It looks like old damage, possibly a burn from a heat or light source.
@Yvonne G can explain better.
 

Swank1987

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It's not normal shell growth. It looks like old damage, possibly a burn from a heat or light source.
@Yvonne G can explain better.
Thank you for your response. I’m really looking to know what I can do to resolve. I’m having issues finding a vet to make house calls and he’s not something I can move on my own.
 

Yvonne G

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This is a classic example of a burned shell because a light or heat source was too close to the animal.

There's nothing you can do about it (besides making sure he's not under a light). It's old. It's healed. It's not causing him any pain. He doesn't need a vet.

Take a soft bristle brush and some baby shampoo and water, and scrub the area clean. After he's been in the sun and the shell is dry, massage in some cold pressed coconut oil. Leave the oil on the shell for a half hour or so, then take a soft, absorbent cloth and polish it off.
 

Swank1987

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This is a classic example of a burned shell because a light or heat source was too close to the animal.

There's nothing you can do about it (besides making sure he's not under a light). It's old. It's healed. It's not causing him any pain. He doesn't need a vet.

Take a soft bristle brush and some baby shampoo and water, and scrub the area clean. After he's been in the sun and the shell is dry, massage in some cold pressed coconut oil. Leave the oil on the shell for a half hour or so, then take a soft, absorbent cloth and polish it off.
Thank you so much for the response. Really glad to know he’s not in pain and the issue will correct itself. I’ll add some coconut oil. Thanks again
 

TammyJ

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It would be nice to have some pictures of your pretty polished tortoise!
 

Yvonne G

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Thank you so much for the response. Really glad to know he’s not in pain and the issue will correct itself. I’ll add some coconut oil. Thanks again
No, don't misunderstand, it never going to "correct itself." Unless it was burned badly enough to have killed the existing bone and keratin, nothing is going to change. Now if the bone and keratin HAS died, then new bone and keratin will grow UNDER that wonky-looking part. And in a couple years, maybe more, the dead part will pop off, exposing the new shell. But you'll always be able to I.D. your tortoise. He's special and very handsome!
 

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