Hibernate or Not, Poll

Yuukari

New Member
5 Year Member
Joined
Apr 28, 2014
Messages
28
I'm curious how many choose/allow their tortoise/tortoises to hibernate, and how many do not. Also how everyone does it preferred methods etc
Your responses are very appreciated.
Thank you in advance!
:tort::tort::tort::tort:.
 

Tom

The Dog Trainer
10 Year Member!
Platinum Tortoise Club
Joined
Jan 9, 2010
Messages
49,116
Location (City and/or State)
Southern California
I hibernate any species that would hibernate in the wild. I do this indoors in controlled safe conditions. Sometimes, for some species, I use a fridge.
 

WithLisa

Well-Known Member
5 Year Member
Joined
Jan 3, 2015
Messages
967
Location (City and/or State)
Austria
I hibernate my Hermanns. Here in Austria (as well as in Switzerland) it's not even allowed to keep them awake since hibernation is part of their natural biorhythm.

They have an outside enclosure with a cold frame that's heated to keep the frost out. I have to do nothing at all, I just make sure that all tortoises are inside the coldframe before the first severe frost. Then I close the entrance, cover the whole thing with styrofoam for insulation and wait for spring. :)
 

ascott

Well-Known Member
5 Year Member
Joined
Apr 10, 2011
Messages
16,147
Location (City and/or State)
Apple Valley, California
I hibernate my Hermanns. Here in Austria (as well as in Switzerland) it's not even allowed to keep them awake since hibernation is part of their natural biorhythm.

They have an outside enclosure with a cold frame that's heated to keep the frost out. I have to do nothing at all, I just make sure that all tortoises are inside the coldframe before the first severe frost. Then I close the entrance, cover the whole thing with styrofoam for insulation and wait for spring. :)
That is awesome..
 

dmmj

The member formerly known as captain awesome
Moderator
10 Year Member!
Joined
Aug 15, 2008
Messages
19,752
Location (City and/or State)
CA
Russians leopards sulcata redfoot desert tortoise I hibernate only the Russians and desert tortoise. outdoors but in the shed to protect from weather extremes.
 

Blakem

Well-Known Member
5 Year Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2012
Messages
2,386
Location (City and/or State)
California
I had a russian tortoise for almost 4 years (i recently adopted him out) and I wasn't comfortable enough to allow him to hibernate. I would like to since it is a natural thing, but I am afraid I might do something wrong in preparation for hibernation.

To not allow hibernation, during winter, I put him in a 3x3, two story terrarium. I did not allow for my temperatures to drop below 70f. Doing so, disrupts the natural process of him going into hibernation. I still soaked him a few times a week and gave a pinch of food daily. During this time, he didn't perform very much physical activity.
 

Gillian M

Well-Known Member
5 Year Member
Joined
Aug 28, 2014
Messages
14,962
Location (City and/or State)
Jordan
I don't hibernate OLI (my beloved :<3:Greek tort) any more.
 

Anyfoot

Well-Known Member
5 Year Member
Joined
Nov 24, 2014
Messages
6,312
Location (City and/or State)
UK Sheffield
I hibernate my Hermanns. Here in Austria (as well as in Switzerland) it's not even allowed to keep them awake since hibernation is part of their natural biorhythm.

They have an outside enclosure with a cold frame that's heated to keep the frost out. I have to do nothing at all, I just make sure that all tortoises are inside the coldframe before the first severe frost. Then I close the entrance, cover the whole thing with styrofoam for insulation and wait for spring. :)
Hi Lisa. Have you ever had any fatalities through the hibernation period? Horrible question, sorry.
 

WithLisa

Well-Known Member
5 Year Member
Joined
Jan 3, 2015
Messages
967
Location (City and/or State)
Austria
Hi Lisa. Have you ever had any fatalities through the hibernation period? Horrible question, sorry.
The torts I have now are still babies and only survived one winter (without problems).
But I grew up with tortoises, my mother had a few adults and sometimes hatchlings. The hibernation method was similar, their cold frames were filled with either autumn foliage or straw and insulated with styrofoam, but not heated (so maybe I'm too nervous, but I feel much more reassured having it heated during severe frost ;)).

As far as I remember in all that years we had only one case of death, a hatchling. But there must have been something wrong with it, it never started to eat and didn't grow, so I guess it would have died anyway. :(
 

Tidgy's Dad

Well-Known Member
5 Year Member
Joined
Feb 11, 2015
Messages
46,526
Location (City and/or State)
Fes, Morocco
I have never hibernated my Tidgy, a Greek tortoise.
To begin with, she was too sick.
Then I decided she was too young.
Now, she is about 5, but I have decided not to this year, but may consider it next year.
I just keep the temperature and lighting at summer levels and make sure she eats well.
She tries to stop eating around now, but I encourage her with irresistible treats for a couple of weeks and soon she reverts to normal behaviour.
 

Yvonne G

Old Timer
TFO Admin
10 Year Member!
Platinum Tortoise Club
Joined
Jan 23, 2008
Messages
85,260
Location (City and/or State)
Clovis, CA
I don't allow babies to hibernate until they've reached their third year. All my desert tortoises and Russian tortoises hibernate, unless I notice one of them isn't heavy enough to withstand the stress of hibernation.
 

Jacqui

Wanna be raiser of Lemon Drop tortoises
Moderator
10 Year Member!
Joined
Aug 28, 2007
Messages
39,230
Location (City and/or State)
A Land Far Away...
Sometimes I do and some times I don't. I tend to always allow at least some of the box turtles to each year. One winter I allowed a Russian to hibernate outside in the enclosure (like the bodies do). When I would hibernate the Russians one year I did all of them, one year just females and one just males.
 

Tom

The Dog Trainer
10 Year Member!
Platinum Tortoise Club
Joined
Jan 9, 2010
Messages
49,116
Location (City and/or State)
Southern California
Sometimes I do and some times I don't. I tend to always allow at least some of the box turtles to each year. One winter I allowed a Russian to hibernate outside in the enclosure (like the bodies do). When I would hibernate the Russians one year I did all of them, one year just females and one just males.
I assume you were doing those things as an experiment, yes?

What were the results? What were the differences observed when hibernating all of them, just males, or just females? I've never known anyone to try this, so what happened?
 

New Posts

Top