Why my eggs are shrinking

Kapidolo Farms

Well-Known Member
Tortoise Club
5 Year Member
Platinum Tortoise Club
Joined
Nov 7, 2012
Messages
5,130
Location (City and/or State)
South of Southern California, but not Mexico
I see we are in the part of TFO for Egyptian tortoises. You had 22 Egyptian tortoise eggs all at once? You might simply try putting smaller groups in a single tub and using different substrates. I use a few kinds for the very reason that one may not work among all the other variables that can be present.

What kind of incubator are you using? Have any ever hatched from a larger number of eggs, 22 did not hatch but others did? Given the average clutch size for Egyptians at 3, that would suggest you have 7 or more females that have laid, is there more than one male?

Egg quality can also be a factor. The diet may support egg production, but the females may be deficient in some nutrient. That goes a bit deeper than just incubation method which is a good first issue to get straight.

Can you post a picture of your egg laying females?
 

Mina Adel

Member
Joined
Mar 17, 2016
Messages
225
I lost 2 eggs .. broken by the female.
No substrate at that time.

1461618031044
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Mina Adel

Member
Joined
Mar 17, 2016
Messages
225
Some torts of my group
6 small males
6 large females.

1461618147526
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Kapidolo Farms

Well-Known Member
Tortoise Club
5 Year Member
Platinum Tortoise Club
Joined
Nov 7, 2012
Messages
5,130
Location (City and/or State)
South of Southern California, but not Mexico
Nice images, thanks for sharing them. I really want to see you succeed. I would suggest trying a few different incubation mediums. The image you showed looked like you were using peat or coco coir. I know humidity is critical, but not directly on the egg. Humidity around the egg is good, not literally water on the egg.

Many people use a incubation medium/substrate that holds the egg on many small points. (sounds funny but try to make a picture in your mind).

If you used three marbles under each egg, the points of contact would be three places and the rest of the space around the egg would be air. The substrate you are using looks like there are two many points of contact to the egg.

You can put the moist coco or peat in the container, keep it moist, but then use a layer of coarse sand so the eggs have air around them. Many people in the US use vermiculite or perlite (they are soil additives for potted plants). If these are not readily available for you, try figuring out some clean moisture holding substrate. Really coarse sand might be your best option. The hold humidity in the incubation chamber you can have a llose fitting lid over the container the eggs are in, or use the peat/coir below a layer of coarse sand.

How do you regulate temperature? Are you using an incubator, or rely on natural ambient temperature?
 

Kapidolo Farms

Well-Known Member
Tortoise Club
5 Year Member
Platinum Tortoise Club
Joined
Nov 7, 2012
Messages
5,130
Location (City and/or State)
South of Southern California, but not Mexico
Aquarium thermometer
For me, a 'thermometer' is how I know what the temperature is. An incubator is the device I keep the box of eggs in so that I can control the incubation environment. Incubators are typically heated and sometimes cooled to maintain a steady environment for egg development.

The incubator is monitored with a thermometer and a humidity gauge, so you can tell if more or less heat and humidity is required.

How do you accomplish this for your eggs?
 

WithLisa

Well-Known Member
5 Year Member
Joined
Jan 3, 2015
Messages
967
Location (City and/or State)
Austria
Since when do you have the tortoises and how do you keep them?
 

Kapidolo Farms

Well-Known Member
Tortoise Club
5 Year Member
Platinum Tortoise Club
Joined
Nov 7, 2012
Messages
5,130
Location (City and/or State)
South of Southern California, but not Mexico
Thank you for the picture of your incubator. So...I would suggest that you could use slightly moistened (almost dry) substrate, and the aquarium heater (thermometer) in the water will maintain an ambient relative humidity sufficient to incubate the eggs. If you have doubts, you can split the eggs into different groups of trays with different slightly moisture substrate profiles. I would split one female's eggs (2 or three eggs) between moisture profiles. That would reduce the potential that one female is more fertile than another as a factor if they hatch or not.

Frankly the incubator you have is excellent. I have used this type of incubator many times with good results. Now that I have a bigger idea of what you are doing, it seems to me that maybe the substrate had been too wet before. Please keep this thread running, even if months later, I'd like to see how it goes.
 

Mina Adel

Member
Joined
Mar 17, 2016
Messages
225
Thank you a lot @Will
Can I ask you another question
Which degree can I choose for them? ...
I did it on 30°c

I have eggs from Egyptian tortoises
And eggs from red ear sliders .
Can you tell me what temp is suitable for each?
 

New Posts

Top